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Chat Transcript with Dr. Cantrell, June 25, 2008
USMC Combat Stress Brochure
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Educational Purpose NOTE: The chat discussion is intended solely for educational and informational purposes and not intended as medical advice. Please consult a medical or mental health professional if you have questions about your health.

No patent liability is assumed with respect to the use of the information discussed. The speakers and/or MarineParents.com assume no responsibility for errors or omissions. Neither is any liability assumed for damages resulting from the participation in the discussion or use of the information discussed.

The following is a transcript of the "Chat with Dr. Cantrell" from June 25, 2008. Links to additional resources and information from the chat transcript are included to the right.

Fryone55:
Welcome to chat with Dr. Cantrell.

Dr. Cantrell:
Thank you.

Fryone55:
Do you have a question for Dr. Cantrell, Kelly?

Kelly Girl:
Hello and thank you.

Kelly Girl:
My son has not yet been diagnosed with post traumatic stress, but the family feels it is certain.

Dr. Cantrell:
Does your son have some issues with his combat stress?

Kelly Girl:
Yes.

Dr. Cantrell:
They are often times reluctant to let people know they are challenged by some of the things they are feeling and thinking.

Kelly Girl:
First let me tell you I've read both of your books and I want to tell you thank you.

Dr. Cantrell:
You are most welcome.

Kelly Girl:
I'm not really certain what I want to ask or if it's asking that I need to do.

A David:
Just a comment to Dr. Cantrell; my son and I sat down and we talked. He is feeling that it is good to know that the feelings do fade in time.

Fryone55:
Kelly, perhaps if you could tell Dr. Cantrell what types of behaviors your son is exhibiting.

Kelly Girl:
That's good to hear, David.

Kelly Girl:
If someone else would like to ask a question, I would like to listen if I could.

Dr. Cantrell:
There are some feelings that fade over time, if they get help. Unfortunately the Vietnam Vets held all of this in for years and it got worse, and we know that early help makes a HUGE difference in how they feeling down the road.

Kelly Girl:
and I'm afraid the holding it in is what is doing him in.

A David:
Yes, he and I know that now.

Dr. Cantrell:
He will in time realize that he may need to tap into some help, and find ways to deal with some of his sleep, anger and anxiety issues.

Kelly Girl:
Yes anger is a huge issue.

Dr. Cantrell:
It is best to not ask too many questions. Observe and ask another Marine or veteran to talk with your son if necessary.

Kelly Girl:
I'm not a doctor, but the anger and non-sleep is a concern. Recently, he expressed feelings of unworthiness.

Kelly Girl:
Well, unworthiness may not be right, but that he's not fitting in and doesn't belong anywhere and no one can understand him. He's certain of that.

Dr. Cantrell:
It would be best if you encouraged him to talk with someone, and to call in other people that have perhaps served with him or have been there to help him connect with professional help.

Kelly Girl:
Unfortunately that is our stumbling block.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, people do understand. This is a stigma that they have, and it is not true. There are many out there who have walked in similar boots, and they do understand.

Dr. Cantrell:
He is NOT alone out there.

Kelly Girl:
I was so grateful to get the newsletter today and I'm off work in time for this chat and now I don't know what to say. I'm so sorry.

Fryone55:
That's okay, Kelly. You are doing fine.

Kelly Girl:
If others have questions please jump in

Ginney:
My son overdosed on April 14 and we are still picking up the pieces. He is going to VA appointments.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, not everyone even says anything. Just sitting and reading as we go along may spark a thought.

Kelly Girl:
I'm so sorry, Ginney.

Dr. Cantrell:
I am so sorry to hear about your son, but it is so good that he is now connected and getting help.

Dr. Cantrell:
Is there anything that you could see in terms of warning signs that might be of help to others here Ginney?

Ginney:
He has one friend still on active duty that he talks to.

Dr. Cantrell:
This is a very good connection for him. We must all remember that it is the love that they have for each other that keeps them going, so this is really powerful.

Ginney:
He hasn't slept in 3 years (nightmares) He totaled his truck in Jan, and started taking VA meds then, but he mixed alcohol with his meds.

Kelly Girl:
Does he live on his own Ginney?

Dr. Cantrell:
This is not so uncommon. It is very difficult for them to sleep and it catches up with them. Then they use the meds and alcohol to try to get sleep.

Ginney:
After the od he lived with me for 6 weeks. He is trying it now in his own apt and going to school again. I call him everyday. My biggest concern is his part time security job. I am keeping his gun since April 14 and he is asking for it back for his security job.

Dr. Cantrell:
Don't they issue him a weapon? It is good that he is being productive and finding his path, but having the weapon may not be a good idea so soon after this incident.

Ginney:
That was my first reaction. I will call his VA doctor tomorrow. He can legally have the gun. I don't think he is unstable. He just made a mistake mixing alcohol with meds.

Kelly Girl:
Do his doctors let you talk with them?

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, this is a perfect intervention. Let them deal with this.

Dr. Cantrell:
It is better to error on being very cautious by calling his VA Doctor.

Ginney:
Thank you. You were here just when I needed advice. Sometimes I feel so helpless to assist my son.

Dr. Cantrell:
You are doing great by reaching out for support. Hang in there, go with your intuition and be cautious with this.

Kelly Girl:
I am feeling helpless.

Kelly Girl:
The advise I get from others is to stay out of it.

Kelly Girl:
After reading your books I don't think that's the right advice.

Dr. Cantrell:
Hopefully there may be other parents or family members who can offer you some support right now. He is here with you and he is getting help, so this is very positive.

Dr. Cantrell:
Not with this type of sensitive situation. Many have taken a passive approach to not rock the boat and it has done gone so well.

Ginney:
I am always waiting for "the other shoe to fall", but I get solice from prayer and family support.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, I understand, but you are doing the right thing by being concerned.

Ginney:
Thank you for your time.

Kelly Girl:
I'm feeling a little bit like we've been left behind now, and that there is no support out there for him. Ginney, you said your son has a Marine he still talks to?

Ginney:
He calls his buddy that is still local and on active duty. He served with him in the same squad in Iraq.

Dr. Cantrell:
Do not give up, and help him find the resources for help.

Kelly Girl:
Oh that sounds good, to have someone he served with in Iraq.

Ginney:
What suggestions do you have about coping with his guilt about accidentally killing civilians?

Dr. Cantrell:
When guilt issues come up, it is a very difficult thing to discuss, because he knows that you were not there and you could not possibly know how he is feeling. Let him know this.

Kelly Girl:
Was your son there in 2003 Ginney?

Ginney:
04

Dr. Cantrell:
Have him redirect his thinking to what he did that he feels was worthy of his duties as a Marine. Help him feel pride in serving his country. Let him know that you love him unconditionally, and you are there if he wants to talk.

Kelly Girl:
That's exactly what my son says, that I could not possibly understand, but he uses that in general terms about all of his emotions not specifically that I can't understand iraq--he doesn't talk about that.

Ginney:
He is very religious and he feels God will damm him.

ltsmom:
Dr. when you have a chance, Theresa has a question

Dr. Cantrell:
It is normal for him not to want to talk to you. Perhaps you have a friend that has served even in wars past that could take him out for a cup of coffee.

Dr. Cantrell:
The God issues are huge and are best addressed by a chaplain, as they get this so often from some of their troops who feel that God abandoned them, etc. This is a very multi layered and is important to come to terms with.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes Theresa

Theresa:
My son got back a month ago, turned 20 in Iraq.

Theresa:
I'm not sure he has ptsd, but boy is he irritatable. He was home for a month. To me he was short tempered. I had to stop him several times.

Fryone55:
To[Private] SDI_FOR_3077 my only child is with the 1/7

Theresa:
just to me, not his dad or any others in his family

Dr. Cantrell:
He may not have PTSD. Only time with tell, but all those who served will have some stress symptoms, such as sleep, anger, may see more alcohol use and social isolation and this is normal.

Theresa:
I think he was disappointed he didn't see any "action".

Theresa:
He was behind the wire all the time.

Theresa:
Definitely the alcohol and anger - he's an only child, has self esteem problems.

Dr. Cantrell:
Even if he didn't see action, he can have some stress symptoms. Perhaps not to the degree who others who were out beyond the wire, but nevertheless some stress will be experienced.

Theresa:
didn't have the "romantic saved his buddies" experience I think he was wanting. He got transferred to intelligence and he was one of the very few Jews there.

Ginney:
Be thankful Theresa. Keep love and pride in every sentence. My son is so guilty about the deaths , yet very very proud to have served.

Dr. Cantrell:
He did other things which supported then entire process. There is a sense of loss about not being out on the front lines with some of those in the rear. But they all did their part, and it was all vital to the process.

Theresa:
There weren't any in the 3/5

Theresa:
Ari didn't join out of patrotism. I think he did to prove something to himself.

Dr. Cantrell:
Being in Intelligence, he is not privi to share some of his duties, but this was his duty and very important.

Theresa:
AND his dad was diagnosed with cancer a month after he left and almost died.

Theresa:
We finally had to call him so he could call the hospital and talk to his dad. He's ok now. I mean, Ari had to call from Iraq to talk to his dad in the ICU.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, this guilt is also a form of grief, so it is important for him to grieve these deaths and look at the bigger picture and when he is in the midst of these types of feelings it is very difficult to 'see beyond the pain'.

Theresa:
I'm SO disappointed at how the Marines handle these kids.

Dr. Cantrell:
This is just another thing with his father's diagnosis that can certainly compound his feelings of being out of control. So the phone call must have helped and offered some reassuance.

Ginney:
Thank you Dr. Cantrell for all your suggestions. I will read your book

Theresa:
He certaintly freaked.

Dr. Cantrell:
Thank you.

Kelly Girl:
Ginney, my son read the Once a Warrior book.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, I am sure this was very difficult for him.

Kelly Girl:
...and he was glad to have read it.

Theresa:
When he was home he tried to "take control" of his dad's Doctor's visits.

Theresa:
what's the book???

Dr. Cantrell:
Once a Warrior Wired for Life - It is our book written to help those who have served transition home after being in the Warzone.

Kelly Girl:
Once a Warrior Wired for Life. I bought it from the newsletter from here.

Kelly Girl:
and Downrange to Iraq and Back is the first book about PTSD.

Ginney:
Thank you all in the chat room. This has been really good for me. I feel better. I am not alone.

Theresa:
He just hated it there.

Dr. Cantrell:
No, you are most certainly not alone.

Kelly Girl:
Ginney much of what you said mirrored what I wanted to say.

Dr. Cantrell:
I would imagine it was not a fun place to be. It is a very harsh assignment.

Fryone55:
theresa, here is the link for the Once a Warrior Book https://marineparentsinc.com/oaw-order.asp

Theresa:
excellent. I'll get it.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, both of my books can be bought from your Marineparents website

Theresa:
You look very young, Dr.

Kelly Girl:
Dr. Cantrell, I would like to learn some coping strategies for me for my sons angry outbursts. I just am not equipped to handle that and frankly it scares me.

Dr. Cantrell:
Coping is important to staying healthy emotionally, physically and spiritually. Find something that you enjoy doing, and make the time for this activity. Do not neglect what you need to find solace in the midst of this journey.

Theresa:
Ari seems like he'll be violent sometimes.

Dr. Cantrell:
Let's talk about the anger for a little bit here.

Theresa:
He's NEVER had a temper. Now if he doesn't like something I ask him, he just snaps

Kelly Girl:
He's very intense when this happens and logic and reasoning have no place in his mind for those moments which often stretch into 1/2 hour sessions of angry accusations.

Theresa:
Accusations about what?

Dr. Cantrell:
First of all, anger is something that they come home with, but along with this are some negative implications. If they are also using alcohol, it can be particularly dangerous to family members.

Kelly Girl:
Thank you, I need help with this.

Dr. Cantrell:
PLEASE LET ME

Dr. Cantrell:
ANSWER ONE AT A TIME

Theresa:
I'd much rather he smoked pot than drank. OK.

Dr. Cantrell:
Anger is not something to take lightly. It can explode, and there is oftentimes no rational thought behind their behaviors.

Dr. Cantrell:
BOTTOM line is that you do not try to stop him, but take yourself out of the house or room and be SAFE.

Dr. Cantrell:
Do not engage and make things worse by matching his intensity, This is a deadend street.

Dr. Cantrell:
When he is calm, let him know how much it concerns you and that you feel afraid when he is out of control.

Dr. Cantrell:
Encourage him to get help with this issue, because in our society anger for males is "acceptable", but it really represents sadness, grief, disappointment, and all the other emotions they feel they cannot express and still be accepted.

Kelly Girl:
I read your answer and I cry. This is not what our family is Dr. Cantrell. To think about removing myself from the situation, when I want to say 'it's okay, no reason to be angry' and pat his hand instead.

Kelly Girl:
and no, I don't do that, there is no time for that, it's out of control. I'm going to have to accept this.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, I understand what you want to do, but you must look at him and see what he needs. Sometimes by making them feel more vulnerable makes the anger more intense.

Theresa:
That makes sense.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, it is scary and this is what they do, and this is also a vital tactic they have to get through some of their own emotions in the combat zone.

Kelly Girl:
Reasoning from me is not part of the picture then...my perceived logic angers him more.

Dr. Cantrell:
I am not saying to not soothe, but timing is everything. You must remain safe and it is important not to allow things to escalate by intensifying a situation.

Theresa:
But he gets mad at almost anything I ask him,no matter how mild the question.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, so do you see what I am saying. They are not rational when they are angry they are reacting.

Kelly Girl:
His capacity for logic is zero when he's in this mode.

Dr. Cantrell:
SO don't ask questions, let him come to you, .

Kelly Girl:
okay

Theresa:
He comes to me for money,that's about it.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, indeed logic is out the window.

Theresa:
Or to do something for him.

Dr. Cantrell:
Money represents support, and doesn't he deserve support from you in that regard too?

Theresa:
He goes thru money like water.

Theresa:
He has no concept of how to use it.

Kelly Girl:
Each deployment was emotionally painful for me, but this, is more painful because I feel alone in the battle and helpless. I was helpless during deployment, but I had hope that he would come home safe.

Dr. Cantrell:
Money means freedom, and now that they are home they are free with their time and their resources. They work hard and they play hard!

Kelly Girl:
indeed

Theresa:
Carelessly so.

Dr. Cantrell:
Hope is all we have, and we must keep this alive.

Theresa:
yes

Theresa:
Dr do you have some concrete things we can do? or say? when they get so mad over seemingly noting?

Kelly Girl:
I feel like he's never really going to make it home.

Dr. Cantrell:
Theresa first, so hold on.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes. Concrete ideas are to have a plan in place before things get out of control that both of you agree upon. Such as stopping communciation if things are getting heated, step away , go for a walk or whatever for 20 minutes or so whatever is agreed upon, and come back to the issue.

Dr. Cantrell:
I teach body scans. I ask them where they feel the first twinge of adrenaline in their bodies, because this is the point at which they have the choice to engage or retreat.

Dr. Cantrell:
They must learn to recognize when they are feeling physically aroused and turn the other direction. This is difficult because it is not part of their Warrior training.

Dr. Cantrell:
Kelly Girl, it is very important that you surround yourself with others who can give you encouragment during these times of doubt. He does not need to hear this in your voice.

Dr. Cantrell:
Do all that you can to stay connected with him while he is away, and if you have a spiritual connection then tap into this to help provide hope and look at the positive side of your connection with your son.

Kelly Girl:
Reading this makes it seem so simple but the practical application. I am such a pollyanna until things go wrong.

Dr. Cantrell:
I have had so many Warriors from all wars tell me that they knew when their mothers were praying for them, as they attribute their safety to that love and support their mothers provided.

Kelly Girl:
That so touches my heart.

Kelly Girl:
I feel like I'm the one that needs to be pulled up by the seat of my pants and shown the right path to take.

Dr. Cantrell:
When we are put to the test, and life hits us in the face, we then see that challenges take their toll. This is the time to pick ourselves up and brush ourselves off and keep moving forward. We learn from some of the difficult challenges life has to offer us and some of these experiences are quite difficult.

Kelly Girl:
I could do 4 years old, I could do 16 years old, but 25 years old after three tours of iraq? I'm just not equipped.

Kelly Girl:
Time to put all of that into action. I used the same verbiage with all my children.

Dr. Cantrell:
Kelly you must keep going. He depends on you. I know it is very difficult for parents because of the limitations you may have, but reaching out to others who have walked in your shoes will help keep you on your path.

Kelly Girl:
Yes, indeed, and we need a PTSDParents.com web site.

Fryone55:
We have a thread for that Kelly. http://www.usmcparents.com/forum/default.asp?group=35

Kelly Girl:
thank you

Dr. Cantrell:
Let Tracy know. I am sure she will hear your request.

Kelly Girl:
I was not aware of that, and this is the first time Ive been off work in time to chat.

Kelly Girl:
I read the newsletter and was so grateful to learn that you would do a column Dr. Cantrell.

Dr. Cantrell:
Thank you. I will be writing one each month.

Kelly Girl:
Thank you for taking the time to do that.

Dr. Cantrell:
If you have questions you might want to send them, and I will address them in the column.

Kelly Girl:
Help me learn how to be a ptsd parent. The Marine part is done, it's time to move on.

Kelly Girl:
The next phase of life is calling us.

Dr. Cantrell:
Read Down Range To Iraq and Back and Once A Warrior Wired for Life. Learn as much as you can so you will see some of the adjustments ahead of time, and you have bee more prepared to reccieve your son when he returns

Kelly Girl:
I have read both and this is why the rest of the family and I have concluded that he has undiagnosed ptsd.

Dr. Cantrell:
Great, this is good to know. You need to be a second set of eyes to help him deal with some of his challenges, and you must know when to call in the reinforcements and help him get help.

Kelly Girl:
I so appreciate your time Dr. Cantrell. How will I reach tracy?

Dr. Cantrell:
Through this website on email.

Kelly Girl:
When and HOW to call in reinforcements without making him angry, that's the catch, because i'm afraid of the anger.

Dr. Cantrell:
Rienforcements come in all forms. Sometimes our troops are not willing to see a mental health professional, so I ask that parents know other veterans to call, or call on their battle buddies, when you see things that are concerning.

Kelly Girl:
Their battle buddies, help me with that terminology.

Dr. Cantrell:
This way you are having some help in the wings and can call upon them to take your son to coffee etc.

Dr. Cantrell:
In the army Battle Buddies are the men and women they serve with, so please be familiar who he has served with.

Kelly Girl:
I understand. I stay in touch with many of the families from his battalion, but to my knowledge he does not.

Dr. Cantrell:
This way you are not implying anything other than asking a veteran or someone he is familar with to check him out.

Kelly Girl:
I understand.

Dr. Cantrell:
Great, this is also another resource. You could even call on the parents and they can mention it to their son or daughter in uniform.

Kelly Girl:
I will do that. Thank you so much for your help.

Dr. Cantrell:
You are most welcome. Good luck, Kelly, and I am so glad you were able to share tonight.

Kelly Girl:
I've certainly monopolized enough of your time and do so appreciate it. It's worth getting off work early on wednedsay.

Kelly Girl:
I will look at that thread, contact tracy with questions, and keep the hope.

Dr. Cantrell:
You must look at the schedule for next month because it is not always on Wednesday, but it is this time.

Kelly Girl:
Yes, and I'm on the west coast, so it's early here.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes by all means keep the hope!!!

Dr. Cantrell:
The transcripts are also posted on the website.

Kelly Girl:
Yes, I've read them too. I'm surprised I missed the thread on the boards.

Kelly Girl:
Thank you so much Dr. Cantrell. Good night. This is a great place for insight.

Dr. Cantrell:
Good night Kelly.

Melissa:
I have a son who is home on emergency leave and has requested to go back to Iraq, is this normal?

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes absolutely, they want to get back to their military family. They feel responsible for those who are left.

Dr. Cantrell:
Is the emergency leave having to do with him?

Melissa:
He was brought home because his newborn son was sick.

Dr. Cantrell:
I see. This is very normal, and if he is not sent back he could have some real issues with this.

Melissa:
He put in a request but doesn't know if they are going to send him back or not.

Dr. Cantrell:
Time will tell, but they are warriors and they have a vow and this is part of his commitment.

Melissa:
The baby has a lifelong disease PKU, so I don't know if that is why they are hesitating.

Dr. Cantrell:
I am sorry to hear he is ill, I hope this all works out.

Melissa:
ty

Melissa:
It is just something they have to live with, but they lost their first son together, so I know that makes it harder.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, so this is certainly something that is very sensitive, and they are probably thinking of his wife's emotional needs as well, especially considering the history.

Melissa:
Yes, but like you said, if he doesn't get to go back, I worry what effect that will have on him.

Ericskatie:
To[Private] Fryone55 ok bye momma

Dr. Cantrell:
This is something that is out of anyone's control at this point, so just be there to support him and it will all work out.

Melissa:
I was surprised by his decision to request to go back, especially with the history, but I also can understand his need to go back.

Dr. Cantrell:
He is a Marine and is feeling it is his duty.

Melissa:
You are right, and he loves being a Marine.

Dr. Cantrell:
Are there any questions for me?

Melissa:
My son's unit lost a young Marine within the first month of this deployment, and my son mentioned having to watch the video of the incident and review it. Should this impact him as much as it would if he had been there while it happened?

Melissa:
He said he had just come off of duty an hour and a half before it happened.

Dr. Cantrell:
It is hard to say because everyone is different. It may not impact him as much because he was not there first hand. There are so many things that happen when they are within close range of an event that this is a few steps removed which is good for him.

Dr. Cantrell:
He may have some survivor guilt because of the timing.

Melissa:
I wondered about that.

Dr. Cantrell:
Just help him to know that his friend would want him to go on and live his life and always remember the good times they had together.

Melissa:
He became very distant from me, his mother, before deployment, and I didn't hear from him much. Since he is married, he spoke more with his wife. He seems to talk about the deployment with his wife openly, but not so much with me.

Dr. Cantrell:
At least he is talking and she is his primary relationship, so this is good. Sometimes they don't talk because they do not want you to see them in a different light, or they know that your role as a mom is to love him, and not worry about what he is doing over there etc.

Dr. Cantrell:
I received a question on the back line where someone told me that their son was spending more of his time with his girlfriend and friends and not at home. This is another thing that happends.

Dr. Cantrell:
They need to blow off steam and be with friends, and sometimes don't realize that spending time with their friends can make the parents feel isolated from them.

Melissa:
Yeah, he even discouraged me from going to the send off, saying he would be very busy and didn't know if he would be able to spend any time with me.

Dr. Cantrell:
I know that is hurtful, but in their minds they are trying to protect you from hurting so much.

military_mom_2:
My National Guard was deployed for 15 months his first deployment and we learned not to ask too many questions... We just wait for him to share what he wants when he is ready.

Dr. Cantrell:
This is the right thing to do and it makes a world of difference. Just love them and be there when they need you!

cjv:
Do you see more PTSD with each deployment?

military_mom_2:
I know a lot of it has to do with the "mom's world" thing too. He doesn't want mom to worry and be upset by what he's seen and done.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, we see more symptoms, and the research says the there are 50 % more acute stress symptoms with each deployment.

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes this is true, he wants to protect his mom!

Fryone55:
Dr Cantrell, do you mean that the more deployments the Marine goes on, the more likely there could be more PTSD?

Dr. Cantrell:
Yes, they are showing that with each deployment they compile more stress on themselves and there are more symptoms shown with more deployments.

Fryone55:
thank you

Dr. Cantrell:
You are welcome,.

military_mom_2:
That sure doesn't make us sleep any better.

Melissa:
Will the break in my son's deployment make a difference?

military_mom_2:
My son came back angry. It's gotten better over the last 2 years

military_mom_2:
But I can't imagine him being more angry when he comes home from his next deployment.

Dr. Cantrell:
I know it is difficult, and since I work with the troops who are coming out of combat, I hear first hand what they are experiencing. I do not candy coat things, and I know it is hard to hear this, but it gives you more understanding of the challenges they face

Dr. Cantrell:
A break works both ways. Sometimes it makes them more angry because they have to let down their guard and then to gear up for another deployment. It requires that they build back up their momemtum and this is difficult

cjv:
Are they able to monitor them while they are deployed or is it just too hard for those who are not on base out doing patrols?

Dr. Cantrell:
Everyone is different. When they experience things such as anger and sleep difficulties, they find ways to work it out in many cases, so they are better equipped the next time an angry moment arises.

Dr. Cantrell:
I know that there are people there they can talk to, but I am not sure how closely they are monitored.

cjv:
I just dont think my son will go seek help

military_mom_2:
I know my son has done much better with his anger and lately he even has shown a sense of humor too, which he never really had

cjv:
Does that mean he might be working though it and can even joke about it now.

military_mom_2:
He just never really shares much, but he does share pictures.

Dr. Cantrell:
Many will not, but I know the leadership is working on encouraging help. As I mentioned earlier, help can come in other forms such as another veteran or another Marine they served with.

Melissa:
Have you seen a difference in the troops that are coming home now and the ones that were there during the first years of the war?

Dr. Cantrell:
Humor is wonderful, and they use this a lot down range as well. Dark humor is one of their coping mechanisms, and if they are using humor at home this is great.

military_mom_2:
Cool, that's good to know, thank you Dr. Cantrell for all your insight, I really appreciate it.

Dr. Cantrell:
The troops who were there early on had other challenges such and the infra structure was not in place, and now they have bases from which to operate, but nevertheless they have all experienced something that is outside a normal human expereince .

usmcmom1981:
So true dr.

cjv:
Thank you Dr. Cantrell. Your information is a comfort.

usmcmom1981:
My hubby has PTSD, but is doing better.

Melissa:
Thank you Dr. Cantrell for your time and answers.

usmcmom1981:
He has had it since Viet Nam.

usmcmom1981:
tks dr cantrell for your help here.

cjv:
Take care, good night and blessings.

Dr. Cantrell:
Wonderful that your husband is doing better. It is the journey, and not the destination that is important with PTSD.

Dr. Cantrell:
Good night everyone. It is an honor to be here with you tonight. My prayers are with you and your Marines.

Dr. Cantrell:
Thank you.

Fryone55:
As always, very informational, thank you.

Dr. Cantrell:
You are welcome.

Dr. Cantrell:
Good night.

   
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