The Commandant's Reading List from MarineParents.com: A Place to Connect & Share™

To view the entire 2013 Commandant's Reading List click here

On January 2, 2013, USMC Commandant General Jim Amos released the 2013 edition of the Commandant's Reading List. For 2013, General Amos not only revised the books on the Reading List, but also revised the structure of the list itself. The list is now divided into five levels, based on rank, with two categories (enlisted and officer) per level. In addition, General Amos created eight categories of "recommended reading" books that cover various topics pertinent to today's Marines. Finally, General Amos created a new section of the Reading List titled "The Commandant's Choice" that contains four books that are required for all Marines, regardless of rank. Each Marine must read at least three books from the "Level" or "Commandant's Choice" selections each year.

The 2013 Commandant's Reading List:


Commandant's Choice

A Message to Garcia

A Message to Garcia

by E. Hubbard

Paperback.
128 Pages.
Published December 26, 2008

From the Publisher:

This tale of a soldier's self-reliance during the Spanish American War is history's greatest motivational lesson, now collected with Elbert Hubbard's most treasured inspirational works.

A Message to Garcia touched so profound a chord in readers that, after its publication in 1899, it became one of the most widely read works in human history. A Message to Garcia tells the story of an American soldier charged with delivering a critical message to a leader of Cuban rebel forces during the Spanish American War. In Hubbard's account, he delivered the urgent missive with no questions asked, no complaining, and no hedging. The enduring and almost unbelievably simple message of the essay is this: When asked to perform a task, don't ask How...? or Why...? or Wouldn't it be better if I . . . ? Just do it-and you will become more valued and respected than you ever imagined possible.

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Leading Marines (MCWP 6-11)

Leading Marines (MCWP 6-11)

by the United States Marine Corps.


The Warrior Ethos

The Warrior Ethos

by S. Pressfield


Warfighting (MCDP 1)

Warfighting (MCDP 1)

by the United States Marine Corps


Levels

Entry Level Enlisted: Recruit/Poolee

Battle Cry

Battle Cry

by L. Uris


Corps Values

Corps Values

by Z. Miller


Making the Corps

Making the Corps

by T. Ricks

Paperback
336 pages
Publisher: Scribner; Anv Rep edition (July 31, 2007)

A must-read for recruit parents.

The United States Marine Corps, with its proud tradition of excellence in combat, its hallowed rituals, and its unbending code of honor, is part of the fabric of American myth. Making the Corps visits the front lines of boot camp in Parris Island, South Carolina. Here, old values are stripped away and new Marine Corps values are forged. Bestselling author Thomas E. Ricks follows these men from their hometowns, through boot camp and into their first year as Marines. As three fierce drill instructors fight a battle for the hearts and minds of this unforgettable group of young men, a larger picture emerges, brilliantly painted, of the growing gulf that divides the military from the rest of America.

Included in this edition is an all-new afterword from the author that examines the war in Iraq through the lens of the Marines from Platoon 3086, giving readers an on-the-ground view of the conflict from those who know it best.

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The Red Badge of Courage

The Red Badge of Courage

by S. Crane

240 Pages
Puffin Classics
November 12, 2009

Young Henry Fleming had always dreamed of performing heroic deeds in battle. But as a raw recruit in the American Civil War, Henry experiences both fear and self-doubt. Will war make him a coward - or a hero?

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Entry Level Officer: Candidate/Midshipman

Battle Cry

Battle Cry

by L. Uris


Corps Values

Corps Values

by Z. Miller


I

I'm Staying With My Boys

J. Proser and J. Cutter

I'm Staying with My Boys is the firsthand look inside the life of one of the greatest heroes of the Greatest Generation. Sgt. John Basilone held off 3,000 Japanese troops at Guadalcanal after his 15-member unit was reduced to three men. At Iwo Jima, he single-handedly destroyed an enemy blockhouse, allowing his unit to capture an airfield. Minutes later he was killed by an enemy artillery round. He was the only Marine in World War II to have received the Medal of Honor, the Navy Cross, and a Purple Heart and is arguably the most famous Marine of all time.

I'm Staying with My Boys is the only family-authorized biography of Basilone, and it features photographs never before published. Distinctive among military biographies, the story is told in first person, allowing readers to experience his transformation, forged in the horrors of battle, from aimless youth to war hero known as "Manila John".

Review from our founder, Tracy Della Vecchia

I was fortunate to be able to read this book as I was watched the HBO mini-series, The Pacific. As a Marine parent, I have become quite a history buff and am particularly fond of Marine Corps history (imagine that!). This book was one I didn't want to put down, and only did so when forced to. It was interesting to read it at the same time as watching The Pacific, but is so well-written you'll enjoy it even beyond The Pacific, and even if you've not seen the mini-series. For those of you who want to know more about Marine Corps history, and this amazing hero of World War II, this book will give you everything you're looking for, including tears and cheers.

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Making the Corps

Making the Corps

by T. Ricks

Paperback
336 pages
Publisher: Scribner; Anv Rep edition (July 31, 2007)

A must-read for recruit parents.

The United States Marine Corps, with its proud tradition of excellence in combat, its hallowed rituals, and its unbending code of honor, is part of the fabric of American myth. Making the Corps visits the front lines of boot camp in Parris Island, South Carolina. Here, old values are stripped away and new Marine Corps values are forged. Bestselling author Thomas E. Ricks follows these men from their hometowns, through boot camp and into their first year as Marines. As three fierce drill instructors fight a battle for the hearts and minds of this unforgettable group of young men, a larger picture emerges, brilliantly painted, of the growing gulf that divides the military from the rest of America.

Included in this edition is an all-new afterword from the author that examines the war in Iraq through the lens of the Marines from Platoon 3086, giving readers an on-the-ground view of the conflict from those who know it best.

Purchase at the EGA Shop


My Men Are My Heroes

My Men Are My Heroes

by N. Helms


The Killer Angels

The Killer Angels

by M. Shaara

Trade Paperback.
368 Pages.
May 28, 1996

From the Publisher:

In the four most bloody and courageous days of our nation's history, two armies fought for two conflicting dreams. One dreamed of freedom, the other of a way of life. Far more than rifles and bullets were carried into battle. There were memories. There were promises. There was love. And far more than men fell on those Pennsylvania fields. Bright futures, untested innocence, and pristine beauty were also the casualties of war. Michael Shaara's Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece is unique, sweeping, unforgettable-the dramatic story of the battleground for America's destiny.

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Primary Level Enlisted: Pvt.-Cpl.

Ender

Ender"s Game

by O. Card

Macmillan (Starscape) Books
Mass Market Paperback
352 Pages
Published July, 1994

In order to develop a secure defense against a hostile alien race's next attack, government agencies breed child geniuses and train them as soldiers. A brilliant young boy, Andrew "Ender" Wiggin lives with his kind but distant parents, his sadistic brother Peter, and the person he loves more than anyone else, his sister Valentine. Peter and Valentine were candidates for the soldier-training program but didn't make the cut-young Ender is the Wiggin drafted to the orbiting Battle School for rigorous military training.

Ender's skills make him a leader in school and respected in the Battle Room, where children play at mock battles in zero gravity. Yet growing up in an artificial community of young soldiers Ender suffers greatly from isolation, rivalry from his peers, pressure from the adult teachers, and an unsettling fear of the alien invaders. His psychological battles include loneliness, fear that he is becoming like the cruel brother he remembers, and fanning the flames of devotion to his beloved sister.

Is Ender the general Earth needs? But Ender is not the only result of the genetic experiments. The war with the Buggers has been raging for a hundred years, and the quest for the perfect general has been underway for almost as long. Ender's two older siblings are every bit as unusual as he is, but in very different ways. Between the three of them lie the abilities to remake a world. If, that is, the world survives.

Ender's Game is the winner of the 1985 Nebula Award for Best Novel and the 1986 Hugo Award for Best Novel.

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Gates of Fire

Gates of Fire

by S. Pressfield


Marine! The Life of Chesty Puller

Marine! The Life of Chesty Puller

by B. Davis


My Men Are My Heroes

My Men Are My Heroes

by N. Helms


Rifleman Dodd

Rifleman Dodd

by C.S. Forester

Hardcover.
160 Pages.
2nd Edition, 2nd Printing.
Published 1990

From the Publisher:

Separated from his company, The Ninety-Fifth Foot, during a skirmish with the French, Rifleman Dodd finds himself behind enemy lines. Somehow, he must pass through them to rejoin his comrades. He manages to organize an ill-disciplined band of Portuguese peasants into a guerilla unit, harassing and disrupting the regular French army in its pursuit of the British. Dodd defends then burns a bridge over the Tagus River that the French plan to cross. unknown to him, they have been ordered to destroy it themselves to cover their own retreat when the tide of the campaign turns against them.

Dodd's heroics are not celebrated upon his return. Indeed no one would ever truly know of them but he is rewarded with a good meal and the knowledge that he will again be fighting alongside his fellows of the Ninety-Fifth, "whose boast was that they were always first into action and last out."

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The Last Stand of Fox Company

The Last Stand of Fox Company

by B. Drury and T. Clavin


The Marines of Montford Point: America

The Marines of Montford Point: America"s First Black Marines

by M. McLaurin

With an executive order from President Franklin Roosevelt in 1941, the United States Marine Corps-the last all-white branch of the U.S. military-was forced to begin recruiting and enlisting African Americans. The first black recruits received basic training at the segregated Camp Montford Point, adjacent to Camp Lejeune, near Jacksonville, North Carolina. Between 1942 and 1949 (when the base was closed as a result of President Truman's 1948 order fully desegregating all military forces) more than 20,000 men trained at Montford Point, most of them going on to serve in the Pacific Theatre in World War II as members of support units. This book, in conjunction with the documentary film of the same name, tells the story of these Marines for the first time.

Drawing from interviews with 60 veterans, The Marines of Montford Point relates the experiences of these pioneers in their own words. From their stories, we learn about their reasons for enlisting; their arrival at Montford Point and the training they received there; their lives in a segregated military and in the Jim Crow South; their experiences of combat and service in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam; and their legacy. The Marines speak with flashes of anger and humor, sometimes with sorrow, sometimes with great wisdom, and always with a pride fostered by incredible accomplishment in the face of adversity. This book serves to recognize and to honor the men who desegregated the Marine Corps and loyally served their country in three major wars.

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Primary Level Officer: WO, 2nd Lt., 1st Lt.

All Quiet on the Western Front

All Quiet on the Western Front

by E. Remarque

Trade Paperback.
304 Pages.
Published September 29, 1996

From the Publisher:

Paul Baumer enlisted with his classmates in the German army of World War I. Youthful, enthusiastic, they become soldiers. But despite what they have learned, they break into pieces under the first bombardment in the trenches. And as horrible war plods on year after year, Paul holds fast to a single vow: to fight against the principles of hate that meaninglessly pits young men of the same generation but different uniforms against each other--if only he can come out of the war alive.

"The world has a great writer in Erich Maria Remarque. He is a craftsman of unquestionably first trank, a man who can bend language to his will. Whether he writes of men or of inanimate nature, his touch is sensitive, firm, and sure."

THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

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Battle Leadership

Battle Leadership

by A. Von Schell

104 Pages
Literary Licensing, LLC
Published October 13, 2012

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Gates of Fire

Gates of Fire

by S. Pressfield


Marine! The Life of Chesty Puller

Marine! The Life of Chesty Puller

by B. Davis


Matterhorn: a Novel of the Vietnam War

Matterhorn: a Novel of the Vietnam War

by K. Marlantes

Grove/Atlantic.
640 Pages.
Published May 10, 2011 (Reprint Edition)

From the Publisher:

Intense, powerful, and compelling, Matterhorn is an epic war novel in the tradition of Norman Mailer's The Naked and the Dead and James Jones's The Thin Red Line. It is the timeless story of a young Marine lieutenant, Waino Mellas, and his comrades in Bravo Company, who are dropped into the mountain jungle of Vietnam as boys and forced to fight their way into manhood. Standing in their way are not merely the North Vietnamese but also monsoon rain and mud, leeches and tigers, disease and malnutrition. Almost as daunting, it turns out, are the obstacles they discover between each other: racial tension, competing ambitions, and duplicitous superior officers. But when the company finds itself surrounded and outnumbered by a massive enemy regiment, the Marines are thrust into the raw and all-consuming terror of combat. The experience will change them forever.

Written over the course of thirty years by a highly decorated Vietnam veteran, Matterhorn is a visceral and spellbinding novel about what it is like to be a young man at war. It is an unforgettable novel that transforms the tragedy of Vietnam into a powerful and universal story of courage, camaraderie, and sacrifice: a parable not only of the war in Vietnam but of all war, and a testament to the redemptive power of literature.

A graduate of Yale University and a Rhodes Scholar at Oxford University, Karl Marlantes served as a Marine in Vietnam, where he was awarded the Navy Cross, the Bronze Star, two Navy Commendation Medals for valor, two Purple Hearts, and ten air medals. This is his first novel. He lives in rural Washington State.

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The Defense of Duffer

The Defense of Duffer's Drift

by E. Swinton


The Forgotten Soldier

The Forgotten Soldier

by G. Sajer

508 Pages.
Published October 15, 2001

This book recounts the horror of World War II on the eastern front, as seen through the eyes of a teenaged German soldier. At first an exciting adventure, young Guy Sajer's war becomes, as the German invasion falters in the icy vastness of the Ukraine, a simple, desperate struggle for survival against cold, hunger, and above all the terrifying Soviet artillery. As a member of the elite Gross Deutschland Division, he fought in all the great battles from Kursk to Kharkov.

His German footsoldier's perspective makes The Forgotten Soldier a unique war memoir, the book that the Christian Science Monitor said "may well be the book about World War II which has been so long awaited." Now it has been handsomely republished as a hardcover containing fifty rare German combat photos of life and death at the eastern front. The photos of troops battling through snow, mud, burned villages, and rubble-strewn cities depict the hardships and destructiveness of war. Many are originally from the private collections of German soldiers and have never been published before. This volume is a deluxe edition of a true classic.

Purchase at the EGA Shop


The Last Stand of Fox Company

The Last Stand of Fox Company

by B. Drury and T. Clavin


The Marines of Montford Point: America

The Marines of Montford Point: America"s First Black Marines

by M. McLaurin

With an executive order from President Franklin Roosevelt in 1941, the United States Marine Corps-the last all-white branch of the U.S. military-was forced to begin recruiting and enlisting African Americans. The first black recruits received basic training at the segregated Camp Montford Point, adjacent to Camp Lejeune, near Jacksonville, North Carolina. Between 1942 and 1949 (when the base was closed as a result of President Truman's 1948 order fully desegregating all military forces) more than 20,000 men trained at Montford Point, most of them going on to serve in the Pacific Theatre in World War II as members of support units. This book, in conjunction with the documentary film of the same name, tells the story of these Marines for the first time.

Drawing from interviews with 60 veterans, The Marines of Montford Point relates the experiences of these pioneers in their own words. From their stories, we learn about their reasons for enlisting; their arrival at Montford Point and the training they received there; their lives in a segregated military and in the Jim Crow South; their experiences of combat and service in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam; and their legacy. The Marines speak with flashes of anger and humor, sometimes with sorrow, sometimes with great wisdom, and always with a pride fostered by incredible accomplishment in the face of adversity. This book serves to recognize and to honor the men who desegregated the Marine Corps and loyally served their country in three major wars.

Purchase at the EGA Shop

U.S. Constitution

U.S. Constitution

To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America's founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket edition of The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America. With more than three million copies in print, this edition's influence has been observed far and wide. It has been held up by senators at press conferences and by representatives during floor debate; found in federal judicial chambers across the country; appeared at conferences on constitutionalism in Russia, Iraq, and elsewhere; and sold at bookstores, U.S. Park Service stores, and other outlets nationwide.

It includes the Bill of Rights and all of the amendments.

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With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

by E. Sledge

Trade Paperback.
352 Pages.
May 1, 2007

From the Publisher:

In The Wall Street Journal, Victor Davis Hanson named With the Old Breed one of the top five books on epic twentieth-century battles. Studs Terkel interviewed the author for his definitive oral history, The Good War. Now E. B. Sledge's acclaimed first-person account of fighting at Peleliu and Okinawa returns to thrill, edify, and inspire a new generation.

An Alabama boy steeped in American history and enamored of such heroes as George Washington and Daniel Boone, Eugene B. Sledge became part of the war's famous 1st Marine Division-3d Battalion, 5th Marines. Even after intense training, he was shocked to be thrown into the battle of Peleliu, where "the world was a nightmare of flashes, explosions, and snapping bullets." By the time Sledge hit the hell of Okinawa, he was a combat vet, still filled with fear but no longer with panic.

Based on notes Sledge secretly kept in a copy of the New Testament, With the Old Breed captures with utter simplicity and searing honesty the experience of a soldier in the fierce Pacific Theater. Here is what saved, threatened, and changed his life. Here, too, is the story of how he learned to hate and kill and came to love-his fellow man.

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Career Level Enlisted: Sgt., SSgt.

First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps

First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps

by V. Krulak

Paperback.
Published February, 1999

From the Publisher:

In this riveting insider's chronicle, legendary Marine General "Brute" Krulak submits an unprecedented examination of U.S. Marines-their fights on the battlefield and off, their extraordinary esprit de corps. Deftly blending history with autobiography, action with analysis, and separating fact from fable, General Krulak touches the very essence of the Corps: what it means to be a Marine and the reason behind its consistently outstanding performance and reputation.

Krulak also addresses the most basic but challenging question of all about the Corps: how does it manage to survive-even to flourish-despite overwhelming political odds and, as the general writes, "an extraordinary propensity for shooting itself in the foot?" To answer this question Krulak examines the foundation on which the Corps is built, a system of intense loyalty to God, to country, and to other Marines. He also takes a close look at Marines in war, offering challenging accounts of their experiences in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. In addition, he describes the Corps's relationship to other services, especially during the unification battles following World War II, and offers new insights into the decision-making process in times of crisis. First published in hardcover in 1984, this book has remained popular ever since with Marines of every rank.

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Islands of the Damned

Islands of the Damned

by R. Burgin and B. Marvel

Paperback.
304 Pages.
Published March 1, 2011

From the Publisher:

One of the real-life heroes featured in HBO(r)'s The Pacific tells his own true story.

R.V. Burgin reveals his experiences as a Marine at war in the Pacific Theater, where Company K confronted snipers, ambushes along narrow jungle trails, abandoned corpses of hara-kiri victims, and howling banzai attacks as they island-hopped from one bloody battle to the next. During his two years of service, Burgin rose from a green private to a seasoned sergeant, and earned a Bronze Star for his valor at Okinawa.

With unforgettable drama and an understated elegance, Burgin's gripping narrative chronicles the waning days of World War II, bringing to life the hell that was the Pacific War.

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Outliers

Outliers

by M. Gladwell

Back Bay Books
336 Pages.
Published June 7, 2011 (Reprint Edition)

In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers. Regarded by many as the most gifted and influential author and journalist in America today, Gladwell has the rare ability to connect with audiences of tremendously varied interests. There are over 10 million copies of his books in print.

Now, Gladwell's landmark investigations into the world around us are collected together for the first time. Beautifully repackaged and redesigned, with newly added illustrations throughout each book, COLLECTED is a perfect treasury of prose and provocation for Gladwell fans old and new.

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Quartered Safe Out Here

Quartered Safe Out Here

by G. Fraser


Soldiers of God

Soldiers of God

by E. Junger

Trade Paperback.
304 Pages.
Published November 27, 2001

From the Publisher:

First time in paperback, with a new Introduction and final chapter

World affairs expert and intrepid travel journalist Robert D. Kaplan braved the dangers of war-ravaged Afghanistan in the 1980s, living among the mujahidin-the "soldiers of god"-whose unwavering devotion to Islam fueled their mission to oust the formidable Soviet invaders. In Soldiers of God we follow Kaplan's extraordinary journey and learn how the thwarted Soviet invasion gave rise to the ruthless Taliban and the defining international conflagration of the twenty-first century.

Kaplan returns a decade later and brings to life a lawless frontier. What he reveals is astonishing: teeming refugee camps on the deeply contentious Pakistan-Afghanistan border; a war front that combines primitive fighters with the most technologically advanced weapons known to man; rigorous Islamic indoctrination academies; a land of minefields plagued by drought, fierce tribalism, insurmountable ethnic and religious divisions, an abysmal literacy rate, and legions of war orphans who seek stability in military brotherhood. Traveling alongside Islamic guerrilla fighters, sharing their food, observing their piety in the face of deprivation, and witnessing their determination, Kaplan offers a unique opportunity to increase our understanding of a people and a country that are at the center of world events.

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Storm of Steel

Storm of Steel

by R. Kaplan

Michael Hofmann, Translator
Paperback.
320 Pages.
Published May, 2004

From the Publisher:

A superlative new translation of one of the greatest works to emerge from the catastrophe of the First World War

A memoir of astonishing power, savagery, and ashen lyricism, Storm of Steel illuminates not only the horrors but also the fascination of total war, seen through the eyes of an ordinary German soldier. Young, tough, patriotic, but also disturbingly self-aware, Jünger exulted in the Great War, which he saw not just as a great national conflict but-more importantly-as a unique personal struggle. Leading raiding parties, defending trenches against murderous British incursions, simply enduring as shells tore his comrades apart, Jünger kept testing himself, braced for the death that will mark his failure.

Published shortly after the war's end, Storm of Steel was a worldwide bestseller and can now be rediscovered through Michael Hofmann's brilliant new translation.

  • Acclaimed new translation based on a new authoritative text
  • Widely viewed as the best account ever written of fighting in World War I

Purchase at the EGA Shop


The Defense of Duffer

The Defense of Duffer's Drift

by E. Swinton


The Forgotten Soldier

The Forgotten Soldier

by G. Sajer

508 Pages.
Published October 15, 2001

This book recounts the horror of World War II on the eastern front, as seen through the eyes of a teenaged German soldier. At first an exciting adventure, young Guy Sajer's war becomes, as the German invasion falters in the icy vastness of the Ukraine, a simple, desperate struggle for survival against cold, hunger, and above all the terrifying Soviet artillery. As a member of the elite Gross Deutschland Division, he fought in all the great battles from Kursk to Kharkov.

His German footsoldier's perspective makes The Forgotten Soldier a unique war memoir, the book that the Christian Science Monitor said "may well be the book about World War II which has been so long awaited." Now it has been handsomely republished as a hardcover containing fifty rare German combat photos of life and death at the eastern front. The photos of troops battling through snow, mud, burned villages, and rubble-strewn cities depict the hardships and destructiveness of war. Many are originally from the private collections of German soldiers and have never been published before. This volume is a deluxe edition of a true classic.

Purchase at the EGA Shop


The Killer Angels

The Killer Angels

by M. Shaara

Trade Paperback.
368 Pages.
May 28, 1996

From the Publisher:

In the four most bloody and courageous days of our nation's history, two armies fought for two conflicting dreams. One dreamed of freedom, the other of a way of life. Far more than rifles and bullets were carried into battle. There were memories. There were promises. There was love. And far more than men fell on those Pennsylvania fields. Bright futures, untested innocence, and pristine beauty were also the casualties of war. Michael Shaara's Pulitzer Prize-winning masterpiece is unique, sweeping, unforgettable-the dramatic story of the battleground for America's destiny.

Purchase at the EGA Shop


U.S. Constitution

U.S. Constitution

To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America's founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket edition of The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America. With more than three million copies in print, this edition's influence has been observed far and wide. It has been held up by senators at press conferences and by representatives during floor debate; found in federal judicial chambers across the country; appeared at conferences on constitutionalism in Russia, Iraq, and elsewhere; and sold at bookstores, U.S. Park Service stores, and other outlets nationwide.

It includes the Bill of Rights and all of the amendments.

Purchase at the EGA Shop


With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa

by E. Sledge

Trade Paperback.
352 Pages.
May 1, 2007

From the Publisher:

In The Wall Street Journal, Victor Davis Hanson named With the Old Breed one of the top five books on epic twentieth-century battles. Studs Terkel interviewed the author for his definitive oral history, The Good War. Now E. B. Sledge's acclaimed first-person account of fighting at Peleliu and Okinawa returns to thrill, edify, and inspire a new generation.

An Alabama boy steeped in American history and enamored of such heroes as George Washington and Daniel Boone, Eugene B. Sledge became part of the war's famous 1st Marine Division-3d Battalion, 5th Marines. Even after intense training, he was shocked to be thrown into the battle of Peleliu, where "the world was a nightmare of flashes, explosions, and snapping bullets." By the time Sledge hit the hell of Okinawa, he was a combat vet, still filled with fear but no longer with panic.

Based on notes Sledge secretly kept in a copy of the New Testament, With the Old Breed captures with utter simplicity and searing honesty the experience of a soldier in the fierce Pacific Theater. Here is what saved, threatened, and changed his life. Here, too, is the story of how he learned to hate and kill and came to love-his fellow man.

Purchase at the EGA Shop


Career Level Officer: CWO-2, CWO-3, Capt.

Attacks

Attacks

by E. Rommel

325 Pages
Athena Press
Published April 6, 2011

ATTACKS is a classic in military literature. First published in Germany in 1937 under the title Infanterie Greift An, it became a great success before World War II and played a major role in launching Rommel on the road to fame. The book went through at least eighteen printings by 1944, when the legendary soldier was forced to commit suicide because of his implication in the plot against Hitler.

The U.S. Army translated the book in 1943 and General George Patton became familiar with it. Patton was reportedly "electrified" by the book, and read it again and again until he knew it by heart. Other Amercian officers also took a keen interest in the book and an abridged edition was published in 1944 by the "Infantry Journal" under the title Infantry Attacks.

Today, 35 years after its initial publication in the United States, the book is mentioned frequently as a magnificent account of imaginative and successful combat leadership. Copies of the wartime English edition are among the most valued works in private collections. All copies in the Library of Congress and in the Army Library in the Pentagon have, however, mysteriously disappeared.

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Black Hearts

Black Hearts

by J. Frederick

Crown Publishing
Trade Paperback
464 Pages.
Published February 9, 2010

This is the story of a small group of soldiers from the 101st Airborne Division's fabled 502nd Infantry Regiment-a unit known as "the Black Heart Brigade." Deployed in late 2005 to Iraq-s so-called Triangle of Death, a veritable meat grinder just south of Baghdad, the Black Hearts found themselves in arguably the country's most dangerous location at its most dangerous time.

Hit by near-daily mortars, gunfire, and roadside bomb attacks, suffering from a particularly heavy death toll, and enduring a chronic breakdown in leadership, members of one Black Heart platoon-1st Platoon, Bravo Company, 1st Battalion-descended, over their year-long tour of duty, into a tailspin of poor discipline, substance abuse, and brutality.

Four 1st Platoon soldiers would perpetrate one of the most heinous war crimes U.S. forces have committed during the Iraq War-the rape of a fourteen-year-old Iraqi girl and the cold-blooded execution of her and her family. Three other 1st Platoon soldiers would be overrun at a remote outpost-one killed immediately and two taken from the scene, their mutilated corpses found days later booby-trapped with explosives.

Black Hearts is an unflinching account of the epic, tragic deployment of 1st Platoon. Drawing on hundreds of hours of in-depth interviews with Black Heart soldiers and first-hand reporting from the Triangle of Death, Black Hearts is a timeless story about men in combat and the fragility of character in the savage crucible of warfare. But it is also a timely warning of new dangers emerging in the way American soldiers are led on the battlefields of the twenty-first century.

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First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps

First to Fight: An Inside View of the U.S. Marine Corps

by V. Krulak

Paperback.
Published February, 1999

From the Publisher:

In this riveting insider's chronicle, legendary Marine General "Brute" Krulak submits an unprecedented examination of U.S. Marines-their fights on the battlefield and off, their extraordinary esprit de corps. Deftly blending history with autobiography, action with analysis, and separating fact from fable, General Krulak touches the very essence of the Corps: what it means to be a Marine and the reason behind its consistently outstanding performance and reputation.

Krulak also addresses the most basic but challenging question of all about the Corps: how does it manage to survive-even to flourish-despite overwhelming political odds and, as the general writes, "an extraordinary propensity for shooting itself in the foot?" To answer this question Krulak examines the foundation on which the Corps is built, a system of intense loyalty to God, to country, and to other Marines. He also takes a close look at Marines in war, offering challenging accounts of their experiences in World War II, Korea, and Vietnam. In addition, he describes the Corps's relationship to other services, especially during the unification battles following World War II, and offers new insights into the decision-making process in times of crisis. First published in hardcover in 1984, this book has remained popular ever since with Marines of every rank.

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Infantry in Battle (FMFRP 12-2)

Infantry in Battle (FMFRP 12-2)

by the United States Marine Corps


Into the Tiger

Into the Tiger's Jaw

by F. Petersen

Paperback.
334 Pages.
Published July 2012

From the Publisher:

"Once I found out what being a United States Marine was all about, jumping into the tiger's jaw was just something to do. We'd been trained for combat. That's our reason for being. When the time comes, hell, stick out your can. Let's go. Let's see what the old tiger's got. Let's jump right into his big, old jaw. That's what I was doing that day in Vietnam when that old tiger caterwauled and bit me. I was flying high. A Lieutenant Colonel, Marine fighter squadron commander. Keeper of the keys. . . . And to make it sweeter our call sign was Black Knights. Hypothetical swords at the ready, I pulled that hot pad duty just like I wanted my men to do it. Five- to twelve-hour stints, depending on the threat and the type of call for assistance. Tiger growled. We listened. Marine troops pinned down, deep in the DMZ. Twenty miles north of the Rock Pile, near An Khe. Target, 15 miles into North Vietnam. We fired up the Phantoms, those big, powerful, weirdly beautiful F-4s-and flew right into that old tiger's jaw. . . ."- From the Prologue

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Islands of the Damned

Islands of the Damned

by R. Burgin and B. Marvel

Paperback.
304 Pages.
Published March 1, 2011

From the Publisher:

One of the real-life heroes featured in HBO(r)'s The Pacific tells his own true story.

R.V. Burgin reveals his experiences as a Marine at war in the Pacific Theater, where Company K confronted snipers, ambushes along narrow jungle trails, abandoned corpses of hara-kiri victims, and howling banzai attacks as they island-hopped from one bloody battle to the next. During his two years of service, Burgin rose from a green private to a seasoned sergeant, and earned a Bronze Star for his valor at Okinawa.

With unforgettable drama and an understated elegance, Burgin's gripping narrative chronicles the waning days of World War II, bringing to life the hell that was the Pacific War.

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On Killing

On Killing

by D. Grossman

Trade Paperback.
416 Pages.
Published June 22, 2009

From the Publisher:

The good news is that most soldiers are loath to kill. But armies have developed sophisticated ways of overcoming this instinctive aversion. And contemporary civilian society, particularly the media, replicates the army's conditioning techniques, and, according to Lt. Col. Dave Grossman's thesis, is responsible for our rising rate of murder among the young.

Upon its initial publication, ON KILLING was hailed as a landmark study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects soldiers, and of the societal implications of escalating violence. Now, Grossman has updated this classic work to include information on 21st-century military conflicts, recent trends in crime, suicide bombings, school shootings, and more. The result is a work certain to be relevant and important for decades to come.

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Outliers

Outliers

by M. Gladwell

Back Bay Books
336 Pages.
Published June 7, 2011 (Reprint Edition)

In the past decade, Malcolm Gladwell has written three books that have radically changed how we understand our world and ourselves: The Tipping Point, Blink, and Outliers. Regarded by many as the most gifted and influential author and journalist in America today, Gladwell has the rare ability to connect with audiences of tremendously varied interests. There are over 10 million copies of his books in print.

Now, Gladwell's landmark investigations into the world around us are collected together for the first time. Beautifully repackaged and redesigned, with newly added illustrations throughout each book, COLLECTED is a perfect treasury of prose and provocation for Gladwell fans old and new.

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Quartered Safe Out Here

Quartered Safe Out Here

by G. Fraser


Sources of Power

Sources of Power

by G. Klein

The MIT Press; Reprint Edition
348 Pages.
Published February 26, 1999

Anyone who watches the television news has seen images of firefighters rescuing people from burning buildings and paramedics treating bombing victims. How do these individuals make the split-second decisions that save lives? Most studies of decision making, based on artificial tasks assigned in laboratory settings, view people as biased and unskilled. Gary Klein is one of the developers of the naturalistic decision-making approach, which views people as inherently skilled and experienced.

Since 1985, Klein has conducted fieldwork to find out how people tackle challenges in difficult, nonroutine situations. Sources of Power is based on observations of humans acting under such real-life constraints as time pressure, high stakes, personal responsibility, and shifting conditions. In addition to providing information that can be used by professionals in management, psychology, engineering, and other fields, the book presents an overview of the research approach of naturalistic decision making and expands our knowledge of the strengths people bring to difficult tasks.

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The Virtues of War

The Virtues of War

by S. Pressfield

Bantam
368 Pages.
Published September 27, 2005

I have always been a soldier. I have known no other life. So begins Alexander's extraordinary confession on the eve of his greatest crisis of leadership. By turns heroic and calculating, compassionate and utterly merciless, Alexander recounts with a warrior's unflinching eye for detail the blood, the terror, and the tactics of his greatest battlefield victories. Whether surviving his father's brutal assassination, presiding over a massacre, or weeping at the death of a beloved comrade-in-arms, Alexander never denies the hard realities of the code by which he lives: the virtues of war. But as much as he was feared by his enemies, he was loved and revered by his friends, his generals, and the men who followed him into battle. Often outnumbered, never outfought, Alexander conquered every enemy the world stood against him-but the one he never saw coming. . . .

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U.S. Constitution

U.S. Constitution

To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America's founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket edition of The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America. With more than three million copies in print, this edition's influence has been observed far and wide. It has been held up by senators at press conferences and by representatives during floor debate; found in federal judicial chambers across the country; appeared at conferences on constitutionalism in Russia, Iraq, and elsewhere; and sold at bookstores, U.S. Park Service stores, and other outlets nationwide.

It includes the Bill of Rights and all of the amendments.

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War Made New

War Made New

by M. Boot

Gotham
640 Pages.
Published August 16, 2007

Combining gripping narrative history with wide-ranging analysis, War Made New focuses on four "revolutions" in military affairs and describes how inventions ranging from gunpowder to GPS-guided air strikes have remade the field of battle-and shaped the rise and fall of empires.

War Made New begins with the Gunpowder Revolution and explains warfare's evolution from ritualistic, drawn-out engagements to much deadlier events, precipitating the rise of the modern nation-state. He next explores the triumph of steel and steam during the Industrial Revolution, showing how it powered the spread of European colonial empires. Moving into the twentieth century and the Second Industrial Revolution, Boot examines three critical clashes of World War II to illustrate how new technology such as the tank, radio, and airplane ushered in terrifying new forms of warfare and the rise of centralized, and even totalitarian, world powers. Finally, Boot focuses on the Gulf War, the invasion of Afghanistan, and the Iraq War-arguing that even as cutting-edge technologies have made America the greatest military power in world history, advanced communications systems have allowed decentralized, "irregular" forces to become an increasingly significant threat.

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Intermediate Level Enlisted: GySgt., MSgt., 1st Sgt.

All Quiet on the Western Front

All Quiet on the Western Front

by E. Remarque

Trade Paperback.
304 Pages.
Published September 29, 1996

From the Publisher:

Paul Baumer enlisted with his classmates in the German army of World War I. Youthful, enthusiastic, they become soldiers. But despite what they have learned, they break into pieces under the first bombardment in the trenches. And as horrible war plods on year after year, Paul holds fast to a single vow: to fight against the principles of hate that meaninglessly pits young men of the same generation but different uniforms against each other--if only he can come out of the war alive.

"The world has a great writer in Erich Maria Remarque. He is a craftsman of unquestionably first trank, a man who can bend language to his will. Whether he writes of men or of inanimate nature, his touch is sensitive, firm, and sure."

THE NEW YORK TIMES BOOK REVIEW

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American Spartans

American Spartans

by J. Warren


Fields of Fire

Fields of Fire

by J. Webb

Bantam
96 Pages.
Published August 28, 2001

They each had their reasons for being a soldier.

They each had their illusions. Goodrich came from Harvard. Snake got the tattoo - Death Before Dishonor - before he got the uniform. And Hodges was haunted by the ghosts of family heroes.

They were three young men from different worlds plunged into a white-hot, murderous realm of jungle warfare as it was fought by one Marine platoon in the An Hoa Basin, 1969. They had no way of knowing what awaited them. Nothing could have prepared them for the madness to come. And in the heat and horror of battle they took on new identities, took on each other, and were each reborn in fields of fire....

Fields of Fire is James Webb's classic, searing novel of the Vietnam War, a novel of poetic power, razor-sharp observation, and agonizing human truths seen through the prism of nonstop combat. Weaving together a cast of vivid characters, Fields of Fire captures the journey of unformed men through a man-made hell - until each man finds his fate.

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Flags of Our Fathers

Flags of Our Fathers

by J. Bradley

Trade Paperback.
224 Pages.
Published 2003

From the Publisher:

New York Times bestseller, Flags of Our Fathers is the unforgettable chronicle of perhaps the most famous moment in American military history: the raising of the U.S. flag at Iwo Jima.

Here is the true story behind the immortal photograph that has come to symbolize the courage and indomitable will of America. In February 1945, American Marines plunged into the surf at Iwo Jima-and into history. Through a hail of machine-gun and mortar fire that left the beaches strewn with comrades, they battled to the island's highest peak. And there, they raised a flag. The son of one of the flag raisers has written a powerful account of six very different men who came together in the heroic battle.

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Helmet For My Pillow

Helmet For My Pillow

by R. Leckie

320 pages
Bantam Trade Paperback
Published February 2, 2010

Here is one of the most riveting first-person accounts ever to come out of World War II. Robert Leckie enlisted in the United States Marine Corps in January 1942, shortly after the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor. In Helmet for My Pillow we follow his odyssey, from basic training on Parris Island, South Carolina, all the way to the raging battles in the Pacific, where some of the war's fiercest fighting took place. Recounting his service with the 1st Marine Division and the brutal action on Guadalcanal, New Britain, and Peleliu, Leckie spares no detail of the horrors and sacrifices of war, painting an unvarnished portrait of how real warriors are made, fight, and often die in the defense of their country.

From the live-for-today rowdiness of marines on leave to the terrors of jungle warfare against an enemy determined to fight to the last man, Leckie describes what war is really like when victory can only be measured inch by bloody inch. Woven throughout are Leckie's hard-won, eloquent, and thoroughly unsentimental meditations on the meaning of war and why we fight. Unparalleled in its immediacy and accuracy, Helmet for My Pillow will leave no reader untouched. This is a book that brings you as close to the mud, the blood, and the experience of war as it is safe to come.

Now producers Tom Hanks, Steven Spielberg, and Gary Goetzman, the men behind Band of Brothers, have adapted material from Helmet for My Pillow for HBO's epic miniseries The Pacific, which will thrill and edify a whole new generation.

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On Killing

On Killing

by D. Grossman

Trade Paperback.
416 Pages.
Published June 22, 2009

From the Publisher:

The good news is that most soldiers are loath to kill. But armies have developed sophisticated ways of overcoming this instinctive aversion. And contemporary civilian society, particularly the media, replicates the army's conditioning techniques, and, according to Lt. Col. Dave Grossman's thesis, is responsible for our rising rate of murder among the young.

Upon its initial publication, ON KILLING was hailed as a landmark study of the techniques the military uses to overcome the powerful reluctance to kill, of how killing affects soldiers, and of the societal implications of escalating violence. Now, Grossman has updated this classic work to include information on 21st-century military conflicts, recent trends in crime, suicide bombings, school shootings, and more. The result is a work certain to be relevant and important for decades to come.

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The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us and What We Can Do About It

The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us and What We Can Do About It

by J. Ramo

Bantam
Trade Paperback
304 Pages.
Published June 2, 2010

Today the very ideas that made America great imperil its future. Our plans go awry and policies fail. History's grandest war against terrorism creates more terrorists. Global capitalism, intended to improve lives, increases the gap between rich and poor. Decisions made to stem a financial crisis guarantee its worsening. Environmental strategies to protect species lead to their extinction.

The traditional physics of power has been replaced by something radically different. In The Age of the Unthinkable, Joshua Cooper Ramo puts forth a revelatory new model for understanding our dangerously unpredictable world. Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, he describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility.

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The Changing Face of War

The Changing Face of War

by M. Van Creveld

Presidio
Trade Paperback
336 Pages.
Published January 29, 2008

One of the most influential experts on military history and strategy has now written his magnum opus, an original and provocative account of the past hundred years of global conflict. The Changing Face of War is the book that reveals the path that led to the impasse in Iraq, why powerful standing armies are now helpless against ill-equipped insurgents, and how the security of sovereign nations may be maintained in the future.

While paying close attention to the unpredictable human element, Martin van Creveld takes us on a journey from the last century's clashes of massive armies to today's short, high-tech, lopsided skirmishes and frustrating quagmires. Here is the world as it was in 1900, controlled by a handful of "great powers," mostly European, with the memories of eighteenth-century wars still fresh. Armies were still led by officers riding on horses, messages conveyed by hand, drum, and bugle. As the telegraph, telephone, and radio revolutionized communications, big-gun battleships like the British Dreadnought, the tank, and the airplane altered warfare.

Van Creveld paints a powerful portrait of World War I, in which armies would be counted in the millions, casualties-such as those in the cataclysmic battle of the Marne-would become staggering, and deadly new weapons, such as poison gas, would be introduced. Ultimately, Germany's plans to outmaneuver her enemies to victory came to naught as the battle lines ossified and the winners proved to be those who could produce the most weapons and provide the most soldiers.

The Changing Face of War then propels us to the even greater global carnage of World War II. Innovations in armored warfare and airpower, along with technological breakthroughs from radar to the atom bomb, transformed war from simple slaughter to a complex event requiring new expertise-all in the service of savagery, from Pearl Harbor to Dachau to Hiroshima. The further development of nuclear weapons during the Cold War shifts nations from fighting wars to deterring them: The number of active troops shrinks and the influence of the military declines as civilian think tanks set policy and volunteer forces "decouple" the idea of defense from the world of everyday people.

War today, van Crevald tells us, is a mix of the ancient and the advanced, as state-of-the-art armies fail to defeat small groups of crudely outfitted guerrilla and terrorists, a pattern that began with Britain's exit from India and culminating in American misadventures in Vietnam and Iraq, examples of what the author calls a "long, almost unbroken record of failure."

How to learn from the recent past to reshape the military for this new challenge-how to still save, in a sense, the free world-is the ultimate lesson of this big, bold, and cautionary work. The Changing Face of War is sure to become the standard source on this essential subject.

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This Kind of War

This Kind of War

by T. Fehrenbach

Potomac
540 Pages.
Published March, 2001

Updated with maps, photographs, and battlefield diagrams, this special fiftieth anniversary edition of the classic history of the Korean War is a dramatic and hard-hitting account of the conflict written from the perspective of those who fought it. Partly drawn from official records, operations journals, and histories, it is based largely on the compelling personal narratives of the small-unit commanders and their troops. Unlike any other work on the Korean War, it provides both a clear panoramic overview and a sharply drawn "you were there" account of American troops in fierce combat against the North Korean and Chinese communist invaders. As Americans and North Koreans continue to face each other across the 38th Parallel, This Kind of War commemorates the past and offers vital lessons for the future.

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U.S. Constitution

U.S. Constitution

To encourage people everywhere to better understand and appreciate the principles of government that are set forth in America's founding documents, the Cato Institute published this pocket edition of The Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the United States of America. With more than three million copies in print, this edition's influence has been observed far and wide. It has been held up by senators at press conferences and by representatives during floor debate; found in federal judicial chambers across the country; appeared at conferences on constitutionalism in Russia, Iraq, and elsewhere; and sold at bookstores, U.S. Park Service stores, and other outlets nationwide.

It includes the Bill of Rights and all of the amendments.

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We Were Soldiers Once...And Young

We Were Soldiers Once...And Young

by H. Moore and J. Galloway

Trade Paperback.
480 Pages.
Published November 23, 2004

From the Publisher:

Each year, the Commandant of the U.S. Marine Corps selects one book that he believes is both relevant and timeless for reading by all Marines. The Commandant's choice for 1993 was We Were Soldiers Once . . . and Young.

In November 1965, some 450 men of the 1st Battalion, 7th Cavalry, under the command of Lt. Col. Hal Moore, were dropped by helicopter into a small clearing in the Ia Drang Valley. They were immediately surrounded by 2,000 North Vietnamese soldiers. Three days later, only two and a half miles away, a sister battalion was chopped to pieces. Together, these actions at the landing zones X-Ray and Albany constituted one of the most savage and significant battles of the Vietnam War.

How these men persevered--sacrificed themselves for their comrades and never gave up--makes a vivid portrait of war at its most inspiring and devastating. General Moore and Joseph Galloway, the only journalist on the ground throughout the fighting, have interviewed hundreds of men who fought there, including the North Vietnamese commanders. This devastating account rises above the specific ordeal it chronicles to present a picture of men facing the ultimate challenge, dealing with it in ways they would have found unimaginable only a few hours earlier. It reveals to us, as rarely before, man's most heroic and horrendous endeavor.

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Intermediate Level Officer: CWO-4, CWO-5, Maj., Lt.Col.

Battle Cry of Freedom

Battle Cry of Freedom

by J. McPherson

Ofxord University Press
952 Pages.
Published December 11, 2003

Filled with fresh interpretations and information, puncturing old myths and challenging new ones, Battle Cry of Freedom will unquestionably become the standard one-volume history of the Civil War.

James McPherson's fast-paced narrative fully integrates the political, social, and military events that crowded the two decades from the outbreak of one war in Mexico to the ending of another at Appomattox. Packed with drama and analytical insight, the book vividly recounts the momentous episodes that preceded the Civil War--the Dred Scott decision, the Lincoln-Douglas debates, John Brown's raid on Harper's Ferry--and then moves into a masterful chronicle of the war itself--the battles, the strategic maneuvering on both sides, the politics, and the personalities. Particularly notable are McPherson's new views on such matters as the slavery expansion issue in the 1850s, the origins of the Republican Party, the causes of secession, internal dissent and anti-war opposition in the North and the South, and the reasons for the Union's victory.

The book's title refers to the sentiments that informed both the Northern and Southern views of the conflict: the South seceded in the name of that freedom of self-determination and self-government for which their fathers had fought in 1776, while the North stood fast in defense of the Union founded by those fathers as the bulwark of American liberty. Eventually, the North had to grapple with the underlying cause of the war--slavery--and adopt a policy of emancipation as a second war aim. This "new birth of freedom," as Lincoln called it, constitutes the proudest legacy of America's bloodiest conflict.

This authoritative volume makes sense of that vast and confusing "second American Revolution" we call the Civil War, a war that transformed a nation and expanded our heritage of liberty.

Features

  • The definitive one-volume history of the Civil War
  • Filled with fresh interpretations and punctures old myths
  • Integrates the political, social, and military events

A fast-paced narrative which fully integrates the political, social, and military events that crowded the two decades from the outbreak of one war in Mexico to the ending of another at Appomattox.

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Blink

Blink

by M. Gladwell

Trade Paperback.
320 Pages.
Published 2007

From the Publisher:

In his landmark bestseller The Tipping Point, Malcolm Gladwell redefined how we understand the world around us. Now, in Blink, he revolutionizes the way we understand the world within. Blink is a book about how we think without thinking, about choices that seem to be made in an instant-in the blink of an eye-that actually aren't as simple as they seem. Why are some people brilliant decision makers, while others are consistently inept? Why do some people follow their instincts and win, while others end up stumbling into error? How do our brains really work-in the office, in the classroom, in the kitchen, and in the bedroom? And why are the best decisions often those that are impossible to explain to others?In Blink we meet the psychologist who has learned to predict whether a marriage will last, based on a few minutes of observing a couple; the tennis coach who knows when a player will double-fault before the racket even makes contact with the ball; the antiquities experts who recognize a fake at a glance. Here, too, are great failures of "blink": the election of Warren Harding; "New Coke"; and the shooting of Amadou Diallo by police. Blink reveals that great decision makers aren't those who process the most information or spend the most time deliberating, but those who have perfected the art of "thin-slicing"-filtering the very few factors that matter from an overwhelming number of variables.

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Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War

Boyd: The Fighter Pilot Who Changed the Art of War

by R. Coram

Back Bay Books
Paperback
504 Pages.
Published May 10, 2004

John Boyd may be the most remarkable unsung hero in all of American military history. Some remember him as the greatest U.S. fighter pilot ever -- the man who, in simulated air-to-air combat, defeated every challenger in less than forty seconds. Some recall him as the father of our country's most legendary fighter aircraft -- the F-15 and F-16. Still others think of Boyd as the most influential military theorist since Sun Tzu. They know only half the story. Boyd, more than any other person, saved fighter aviation from the predations of the Strategic Air Command. His manual of fighter tactics changed the way every air force in the world flies and fights. He discovered a physical theory that forever altered the way fighter planes were designed. Later in life, he developed a theory of military strategy that has been adopted throughout the world and even applied to business models for maximizing efficiency. And in one of the most startling and unknown stories of modern military history, the Air Force fighter pilot taught the U.S. Marine Corps how to fight war on the ground. His ideas led to America's swift and decisive victory in the Gulf War and foretold the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. On a personal level, Boyd rarely met a general he couldn't offend. He was loud, abrasive, and profane. A man of daring, ferocious passion and intractable stubbornness, he was that most American of heroes -- a rebel who cared not for his reputation or fortune but for his country. He was a true patriot, a man who made a career of challenging the shortsighted and self-serving Pentagon bureaucracy. America owes Boyd and his disciples -- the six men known as the "Acolytes" -- a great debt. Robert Coram finally brings to light the remarkable story of a man who polarized all who knew him, but who left a legacy that will influence the military -- and all of America -- for decades to come.

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Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak

Brute: The Life of Victor Krulak

by R. Coram

Potomac Books
Paperback
374 Pages.
Published November 10, 2004

Victor "Brute" Krulak is arguably the most important officer in the history of the U.S. Marine Corps. In China, he went on daring spy missions. In World War II, he was instrumental in developing amphibious vehicles, and masterminded the invasion of Okinawa. In Korea, he was a combat hero and pioneered the use of helicopters in warfare. In Vietnam, he devised a holistic strategy to fighting the Viet Cong, but when he stood up to LBJ, Krulak was forced to retire. Yet perhaps all of his accomplishments pale in comparison to what he did after World War II and again after Korea: Krulak almost single-handedly stopped the U.S. government from abolishing the Marine Corps. And all the while, he kept secret the truth that he feared would destroy him.

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Carnage and Culture

Carnage and Culture

by V. Hanson

Anchor Books
Paperback
544 Pages.
Published August 27, 2002

Examining nine landmark battles from ancient to modern times--from Salamis, where outnumbered Greeks devastated the slave army of Xerxes, to Cortes's conquest of Mexico to the Tet offensive--Victor Davis Hanson explains why the armies of the West have been the most lethal and effective of any fighting forces in the world.

Looking beyond popular explanations such as geography or superior technology, Hanson argues that it is in fact Western culture and values-the tradition of dissent, the value placed on inventiveness and adaptation, the concept of citizenship-which have consistently produced superior arms and soldiers. Offering riveting battle narratives and a balanced perspective that avoids simple triumphalism, Carnage and Culture demonstrates how armies cannot be separated from the cultures that produce them and explains why an army produced by a free culture will always have the advantage.

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Command Culture

Command Culture

by J. Muth

University of North Texas Press
368 Pages.
Published June 10, 2011

Command Culture examines the different paths the United States Army and the German Armed Forces traveled to select, educate, and promote their officers in the crucial time before World War II. While previous scholarship explores either the officer corps of the German army or their American counterparts, and rarely touches on a comparison in depth, Jorg Muth has done extensive studies on both armies and societies.

In contrast to previous studies, Command Culture is less concerned with the number of years officers stayed at schools or the hours they were taught in a certain discipline. Rather, Muth explores teaching philosophies at the respective military schools and academies in Germany and the United States, the selection of the faculty and the officer students, and what the respective armies thought an officer ought to be and how he was supposed to command.

Muth demonstrates that the military education system in Germany represented an organized effort where each school and examination provided the stepping stone for the next. In the United States there existed no communication about teaching contents or didactical matters among the various schools and academies, and they existed in a self chosen insular environment. American officers who finally made their way through an erratic selection process and past West Point to the important Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, found themselves usually deeply disappointed, because they were faced again with a rather below average faculty who forced them after every exercise to accept the approved school solution. This narrow-minded approach to the teaching of officers would have severe repercussions for the U.S. Army's command culture in World War II and explains much about the conduct of war on the American side.

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Defeat into Victory

Defeat into Victory

by W. Slim

Cooper Square Press
Published 2000

Field Marshal Viscount Slim (1891-1970) led shattered British forces from Burma to India in one of the lesser-known but more nightmarish retreats of World War II. He then restored his army's fighting capabilities and morale with virtually no support from home and counterattacked. His army's slaughter of Japanese troops ultimately liberated India and Burma.

The first edition of Defeat Into Victory , published in 1956, was an immediate sensation selling 20,000 copies within a few days. This is an updated version with a new introduction by David W. Hogan Jr.

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Forgotten Warriors

Forgotten Warriors

by T. Hammes

Univerity Press of Kansas
Paperback
258 Pages.
Published September, 2012

When the Korean War broke out in 1950, the Marine Corps was ordered to deploy an air-ground brigade in less than ten days, even though no such brigade existed at the time. Assembled from the woefully understrength 1st Marine Division and 1st Marine Air Wing units, the Brigade shipped out only six days after activation, sailed directly to Korea, was in combat within ninety-six hours of landing and, despite these enormous handicaps and numerically superior enemy forces, won every one of its engagements and helped secure the Pusan Perimeter.

Despite its remarkable achievements, the Brigade's history has largely been lost amid accounts of the sweeping operations that followed. Its real history has been replaced by myths that attribute its success to tough training, great conditioning, unit cohesion, and combat-experienced officers. None of which were true. T. X. Hammes now reveals the real story of the Brigade's success, prominently citing the Corps' crucial ability to maintain its ethos, culture, and combat effectiveness during the period between World War II and Korea, when its very existence was being challenged.

By studying the Corps from 1945 to 1950, Hammes shows that it was indeed the culture of the Corps-a culture based on remembering its storied history and learning to face modern challenges-that was responsible for the Brigade's success. The Corps remembered the human factors that made it so successful in past wars, notably the ethos of never leaving another marine behind. At the same time, the Corps demonstrated commendable flexibility in adapting its doctrine and operations to evolutions in modern warfare. In particular, the Corps overcame the air-ground schism that marked the end of World War II to excel at close air support. Despite massive budget and manpower cuts, the Corps continued to experiment and learn even as it clung to its historical lodestones. This approach was validated during the Brigade's trial by fire.

More than a mere battle history, Forgotten Warriors gets to the heart of marine culture to show that fighting forces have to both remember and learn. As today's armed forces face similar challenges, this book confirms that culture as much as technology prepares America's fighting men and women to answer their country's call.

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Hot, Flat, and Crowded

Hot, Flat, and Crowded

by T. Freidman

Picador
Paperback
516 Pages.
Published November 24, 2009

In this brilliant, essential book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Thomas L. Friedman speaks to America's urgent need for national renewal and explains how a green revolution can bring about both a sustainable environment and a sustainable America.

Friedman explains how global warming, rapidly growing populations, and the expansion of the world's middle class through globalization have produced a dangerously unstable planet--one that is "hot, flat, and crowded." In this Release 2.0 edition, he also shows how the very habits that led us to ravage the natural world led to the meltdown of the financial markets and the Great Recession. The challenge of a sustainable way of life presents the United States with an opportunity not only to rebuild its economy, but to lead the world in radically innovating toward cleaner energy. And it could inspire Americans to something we haven't seen in a long time--nation-building in America--by summoning the intelligence, creativity, and concern for the common good that are our greatest national resources.

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Just and Unjust Wars

Just and Unjust Wars

by M. Walzer

Basic Books
400 Pages.
Published July 26, 2006

From the Athenian attack on Melos to the My Lai Massacre, from the wars in the Balkans through the first war in Iraq, Michael Walzer examines the moral issues surrounding military theory, war crimes, and the spoils of war. He studies a variety of conflicts over the course of history, as well as the testimony of those who have been most directly involved--participants, decision makers, and victims. In his introduction to this new edition, Walzer specifically addresses the moral issues surrounding the war in and occupation of Iraq, reminding us once again that "the argument about war and justice is still a political and moral necessity."

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Military Innovation in the Interwar Period

Military Innovation in the Interwar Period

by W. Murray and A. Millett

Cambridge University Press
Paperback
448 Pages.
Published November 24, 2009

This study of major military innovations in the 1920s and 1930s explores differences in innovating exploitation by the seven major military powers. This volume of comparative essays investigates how and why innovation occurred or did not occur, and explains much of the strategic and operative performance of the Axis and Allies in World War II.

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Ripples of Battle

Ripples of Battle

by V. Hanson

Anchor Books
304 Pages.
Published October 12, 2004

The effects of war refuse to remain local: they persist through the centuries, sometimes in unlikely ways far removed from the military arena. In Ripples of Battle, the acclaimed historian Victor Davis Hanson weaves wide-ranging military and cultural history with his unparalleled gift for battle narrative as he illuminates the centrality of war in the human experience.

The Athenian defeat at Delium in 424 BC brought tactical innovations to infantry fighting; it also assured the influence of the philosophy of Socrates, who fought well in the battle. Nearly twenty-three hundred years later, the carnage at Shiloh and the death of the brilliant Southern strategist Albert Sidney Johnson inspired a sense of fateful tragedy that would endure and stymie Southern culture for decades. The Northern victory would also bolster the reputation of William Tecumseh Sherman, and inspire Lew Wallace to pen the classic Ben Hur. And, perhaps most resonant for our time, the agony of Okinawa spurred the Japanese toward state-sanctioned suicide missions, a tactic so uncompromising and subversive, it haunts our view of non-Western combatants to this day.

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The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us and What We Can Do About It

The Age of the Unthinkable: Why the New World Disorder Constantly Surprises Us and What We Can Do About It

by J. Ramo

Bantam
Trade Paperback
304 Pages.
Published June 2, 2010

Today the very ideas that made America great imperil its future. Our plans go awry and policies fail. History's grandest war against terrorism creates more terrorists. Global capitalism, intended to improve lives, increases the gap between rich and poor. Decisions made to stem a financial crisis guarantee its worsening. Environmental strategies to protect species lead to their extinction.

The traditional physics of power has been replaced by something radically different. In The Age of the Unthinkable, Joshua Cooper Ramo puts forth a revelatory new model for understanding our dangerously unpredictable world. Drawing upon history, economics, complexity theory, psychology, immunology, and the science of networks, he describes a new landscape of inherent unpredictability--and remarkable, wonderful possibility.

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The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle

The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle

by J. Gray

242 pages
Bison Books
Published October 1, 1998

J. Glenn Gray entered the army as a private in May 1941, having been drafted on the same day he was informed of his doctorate in philosophy from Columbia University. He was discharged as a second lieutenant in October 1945, having been awarded a battlefield commission during fighting in France. Gray saw service in North Africa, Italy, France, and Germany in a counter-espionage unit.

Fourteen years after his discharge, Gray began to reread his war journals and letters in an attempt to find some meaning in his wartime experiences. The result is The Warriors, a philosophical meditation on what warfare does to us and an examination of the reasons soldiers act as they do. Gray explains the attractions of battle-the adrenaline rush, the esprit de corps-and analyzes the many rationalizations made by combat troops to justify their actions. In the end, Gray notes, "War reveals dimensions of human nature both above and below the acceptable standards for humanity."

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This Kind of War

This Kind of War

by T. Fehrenbach

Potomac
540 Pages.
Published March, 2001

Updated with maps, photographs, and battlefield diagrams, this special fiftieth anniversary edition of the classic history of the Korean War is a dramatic and hard-hitting account of the conflict written from the perspective of those who fought it. Partly drawn from official records, operations journals, and histories, it is based largely on the compelling personal narratives of the small-unit commanders and their troops. Unlike any other work on the Korean War, it provides both a clear panoramic overview and a sharply drawn "you were there" account of American troops in fierce combat against the North Korean and Chinese communist invaders. As Americans and North Koreans continue to face each other across the 38th Parallel, This Kind of War commemorates the past and offers vital lessons for the future.

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Senior Level Enlisted: MGySgt., SgtMaj.

Achilles in Vietnam

Achilles in Vietnam

by J. Shay

272 pages
Simon & Schuster
Trade Paperback
Published October, 1995

In this strikingly original and groundbreaking book, Dr. Shay examines the psychological devastation of war by comparing the soldiers of Homer's Iliad with Vietnam veterans suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder. Although the Iliad was written twenty-seven centuries ago it has much to teach about combat trauma, as do the more recent, compelling voices and experiences of Vietnam vets.

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Assignment Pentagon: How to Excel in a Bureaucracy

Assignment Pentagon: How to Excel in a Bureaucracy

by P. Smith and D. Gerstein

Potomac Books
282 pages
Published November, 2001

Eminently readable, Assignment: Pentagon is the essential guide for the newly assigned military person, fresh civilian, and interested outsider to the Pentagon's informal set of arrangements, networks, and functions that operate in the service and joint service world. From the type of wristwatch one needs to how to succeed in the Joint Staff, the book delivers a wealth of practical advice and helpful hints about surviving the pressures and problems of working in "the Building."

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Command Culture

Command Culture

by J. Muth

University of North Texas Press
368 Pages.
Published June 10, 2011

Command Culture examines the different paths the United States Army and the German Armed Forces traveled to select, educate, and promote their officers in the crucial time before World War II. While previous scholarship explores either the officer corps of the German army or their American counterparts, and rarely touches on a comparison in depth, Jorg Muth has done extensive studies on both armies and societies.

In contrast to previous studies, Command Culture is less concerned with the number of years officers stayed at schools or the hours they were taught in a certain discipline. Rather, Muth explores teaching philosophies at the respective military schools and academies in Germany and the United States, the selection of the faculty and the officer students, and what the respective armies thought an officer ought to be and how he was supposed to command.

Muth demonstrates that the military education system in Germany represented an organized effort where each school and examination provided the stepping stone for the next. In the United States there existed no communication about teaching contents or didactical matters among the various schools and academies, and they existed in a self chosen insular environment. American officers who finally made their way through an erratic selection process and past West Point to the important Command and General Staff School at Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, found themselves usually deeply disappointed, because they were faced again with a rather below average faculty who forced them after every exercise to accept the approved school solution. This narrow-minded approach to the teaching of officers would have severe repercussions for the U.S. Army's command culture in World War II and explains much about the conduct of war on the American side.

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Forgotten Warriors

Forgotten Warriors

by T. Hammes

Univerity Press of Kansas
Paperback
258 Pages.
Published September, 2012

When the Korean War broke out in 1950, the Marine Corps was ordered to deploy an air-ground brigade in less than ten days, even though no such brigade existed at the time. Assembled from the woefully understrength 1st Marine Division and 1st Marine Air Wing units, the Brigade shipped out only six days after activation, sailed directly to Korea, was in combat within ninety-six hours of landing and, despite these enormous handicaps and numerically superior enemy forces, won every one of its engagements and helped secure the Pusan Perimeter.

Despite its remarkable achievements, the Brigade's history has largely been lost amid accounts of the sweeping operations that followed. Its real history has been replaced by myths that attribute its success to tough training, great conditioning, unit cohesion, and combat-experienced officers. None of which were true. T. X. Hammes now reveals the real story of the Brigade's success, prominently citing the Corps' crucial ability to maintain its ethos, culture, and combat effectiveness during the period between World War II and Korea, when its very existence was being challenged.

By studying the Corps from 1945 to 1950, Hammes shows that it was indeed the culture of the Corps-a culture based on remembering its storied history and learning to face modern challenges-that was responsible for the Brigade's success. The Corps remembered the human factors that made it so successful in past wars, notably the ethos of never leaving another marine behind. At the same time, the Corps demonstrated commendable flexibility in adapting its doctrine and operations to evolutions in modern warfare. In particular, the Corps overcame the air-ground schism that marked the end of World War II to excel at close air support. Despite massive budget and manpower cuts, the Corps continued to experiment and learn even as it clung to its historical lodestones. This approach was validated during the Brigade's trial by fire.

More than a mere battle history, Forgotten Warriors gets to the heart of marine culture to show that fighting forces have to both remember and learn. As today's armed forces face similar challenges, this book confirms that culture as much as technology prepares America's fighting men and women to answer their country's call.

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Hot, Flat, and Crowded

Hot, Flat, and Crowded

by T. Freidman

Picador
Paperback
516 Pages.
Published November 24, 2009

In this brilliant, essential book, Pulitzer Prize-winning author Thomas L. Friedman speaks to America's urgent need for national renewal and explains how a green revolution can bring about both a sustainable environment and a sustainable America.

Friedman explains how global warming, rapidly growing populations, and the expansion of the world's middle class through globalization have produced a dangerously unstable planet--one that is "hot, flat, and crowded." In this Release 2.0 edition, he also shows how the very habits that led us to ravage the natural world led to the meltdown of the financial markets and the Great Recession. The challenge of a sustainable way of life presents the United States with an opportunity not only to rebuild its economy, but to lead the world in radically innovating toward cleaner energy. And it could inspire Americans to something we haven't seen in a long time--nation-building in America--by summoning the intelligence, creativity, and concern for the common good that are our greatest national resources.

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Just and Unjust Wars

Just and Unjust Wars

by M. Walzer

Basic Books
400 Pages.
Published July 26, 2006

From the Athenian attack on Melos to the My Lai Massacre, from the wars in the Balkans through the first war in Iraq, Michael Walzer examines the moral issues surrounding military theory, war crimes, and the spoils of war. He studies a variety of conflicts over the course of history, as well as the testimony of those who have been most directly involved--participants, decision makers, and victims. In his introduction to this new edition, Walzer specifically addresses the moral issues surrounding the war in and occupation of Iraq, reminding us once again that "the argument about war and justice is still a political and moral necessity."

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The Face of Battle

The Face of Battle

by J. Keegan

Paperback.
368 Pages.
Published January, 1983

From the Publisher:

Military historian John Keegan's groundbreaking analysis of combat and warfare

The Face of Battle is military history from the battlefield: a look at the direct experience of individuals at the "point of maximum danger." Without the myth-making elements of rhetoric and xenophobia, and breaking away from the stylized format of battle descriptions, John Keegan has written what is probably the definitive model for military historians. And in his scrupulous reassessment of three battles representative of three different time periods, he manages to convey what the experience of combat meant for the participants, whether they were facing the arrow cloud at the battle of Agincourt, the musket balls at Waterloo, or the steel rain of the Somme.

"The best military historian of our generation." -Tom Clancy

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The Mask of Command

The Mask of Command

by J. Keegan

Penguin
400 pages
Published October 4, 1988

In The Mask of Command, John Keegan asks us to consider questions that are seldom asked: What is the definition of leadership? What makes a great military leader? Why is it that men, indeed sometimes entire nations, follow a single leader, often to victory, but with equal dedication also to defeat?

Dozens of names come to mind...Napoleon, Lee, Charlemagne, Hannibal, Castro, Hussein. From a wide array, Keegan chooses four commanders who profoundly influenced the course of history: Alexander the Great, the Duke of Wellington, Ulysses S. Grant and Adolph Hitler. All powerful leaders, each cast in a different mold, each with diverse results.

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Senior Level Officer: Col.-Gen.


Assignment Pentagon: How to Excel in a Bureaucracy

Assignment Pentagon: How to Excel in a Bureaucracy

by P. Smith and D. Gerstein

Potomac Books
282 pages
Published November, 2001

Eminently readable, Assignment: Pentagon is the essential guide for the newly assigned military person, fresh civilian, and interested outsider to the Pentagon's informal set of arrangements, networks, and functions that operate in the service and joint service world. From the type of wristwatch one needs to how to succeed in the Joint Staff, the book delivers a wealth of practical advice and helpful hints about surviving the pressures and problems of working in "the Building."

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Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Lies that Led to Vietnam

Dereliction of Duty: Johnson, McNamara, the Joint Chiefs of Staff and the Lies that Led to Vietnam

by H. McMaster

Harper Perennial
480 pages
Published May 8, 1998

Dereliction Of Duty is a stunning new analysis of how and why the United States became involved in an all-out and disastrous war in Southeast Asia. Fully and convincingly researched, based on recently released transcripts and personal accounts of crucial meetings, confrontations and decisions, it is the only book that fully re-creates what happened and why. It also pinpoints the policies and decisions that got the United States into the morass and reveals who made these decisions and the motives behind them, disproving the published theories of other historians and excuses of the participants.

Dereliction Of Duty covers the story in strong narrative fashion, focusing on a fascinating cast of characters: President Lyndon Johnson, Robert McNamara, General Maxwell Taylor, McGeorge Bundy and other top aides who deliberately deceived the Joint Chiefs of Staff, the U.S. Congress and the American public.

Sure to generate controversy, Dereliction Of Duty is an explosive and authoritative new look at the controversy concerning the United States involvement in Vietnam.

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Diplomacy

Diplomacy

by H. Kissinger

Simon & Schuster
Trade Papaerback
912 pages
Published April, 1995

Moving from a sweeping overview of history to blow-by-blow accounts of his negotiations with world leaders, Henry Kissinger describes how the art of diplomacy has created the world in which we live, and how America's approach to foreign affairs has always differed vastly from that of other nations.

Brilliant, controversial, and profoundly incisive, Diplomacy stands as the culmination of a lifetime of diplomatic service and scholarship. It is vital reading for anyone concerned with the forces that have shaped our world today and will impact upon it tomorrow.

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How Wars End

How Wars End

by G. Rose

Simon & Schuster
432 pages
Published December, 2011

IN 1991 THE UNITED STATES trounced the Iraqi army in battle only to stumble blindly into postwar turmoil. Then in 2003 the United States did it again. How could this happen? How could the strongest power in modern history fight two wars against the same opponent in just over a decade, win lightning victories both times, and yet still be woefully unprepared for the aftermath?

Because Americans always forget the political aspects of war. Time and again, argues Gideon Rose in this penetrating look at American wars over the last century, our leaders have focused more on beating up the enemy than on creating a stable postwar environment. What happened in Iraq was only the most prominent example of this phenomenon, not an exception to the rule.

Woodrow Wilson fought a war to make the world safe for democracy but never asked himself what democracy actually meant and then dithered as Germany slipped into chaos. Franklin Roosevelt resolved not to repeat Wilson's mistakes but never considered what would happen to his own elaborate postwar arrangements should America's wartime marriage of convenience with Stalin break up after the shooting stopped. The Truman administration casually established voluntary prisoner repatriation as a key American war aim in Korea without exploring whether it would block an armistice-which it did for almost a year and a half. The Kennedy and Johnson administrations dug themselves deeper and deeper into Vietnam without any plans for how to get out, making it impossible for Nixon and Ford to escape unscathed. And the list goes on.

Drawing on vast research, including extensive interviews with participants in recent wars, Rose re-creates the choices that presidents and their advisers have confronted during the final stages of each major conflict from World War I through Iraq. He puts readers in the room with U.S. officials as they make decisions that affect millions of lives and shape the modern world-seeing what they saw, hearing what they heard, feeling what they felt.

American leaders, Rose argues, have repeatedly ignored the need for careful postwar planning. But they can and must do a better job next time around-making the creation of a stable and sustainable local political outcome the goal of all wartime plans, rather than an afterthought to be dealt with once the "real" military work is over.

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Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past

Landscape of History: How Historians Map the Past

by J. Gaddis

Oxford University Press
208 Pages
Published February, 2004

What is history and why should we study it? Is there such a thing as historical truth? Is history a science? One of the most accomplished historians at work today, John Lewis Gaddis, answers these and other questions in this short, witty, and humane book. The Landscape of History provides a searching look at the historian's craft, as well as a strong argument for why a historical consciousness should matter to us today.

Gaddis points out that while the historical method is more sophisticated than most historians realize, it doesn't require unintelligible prose to explain. Like cartographers mapping landscapes, historians represent what they can never replicate. In doing so, they combine the techniques of artists, geologists, paleontologists, and evolutionary biologists. Their approaches parallel, in intriguing ways, the new sciences of chaos, complexity, and criticality. They don't much resemble what happens in the social sciences, where the pursuit of independent variables functioning with static systems seems increasingly divorced from the world as we know it. So who's really being scientific and who isn't? This question too is one Gaddis explores, in ways that are certain to spark interdisciplinary controversy.

Written in the tradition of Marc Bloch and E.H. Carr, The Landscape of History is at once an engaging introduction to the historical method for beginners, a powerful reaffirmation of it for practitioners, a startling challenge to social scientists, and an effective skewering of post-modernist claims that we can't know anything at all about the past. It will be essential reading for anyone who reads, writes, teaches, or cares about history.

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Little Book of Economics: How the Economy Works in the Real World

Little Book of Economics: How the Economy Works in the Real World

by G. Ip

Wiley Publishing
258 Pages
Published January, 2013

Not surprisingly, regular people suddenly are paying a lot closer attention to the economy than ever before. But economics, with its weird technical jargon and knotty concepts and formulas can be a very difficult subject to get to grips with on your own. Enter Greg Ip and his Little Book of Economics. Like a patient, good-natured tutor, Greg, one of today's most respected economics journalists, walks you through everything you need to know about how the economy works. Short on technical jargon and long on clear, concise, plain-English explanations of important terms, concepts, events, historical figures and major players, this revised and updated edition of Greg's bestselling guide clues you in on what's really going on, what it means to you and what we should be demanding our policymakers do about the economy going forward.

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Military Power: Explaining Victory and Defeat in Modern Battle

Military Power: Explaining Victory and Defeat in Modern Battle

by S. Biddle

Princeton University Press
352 Pages
Published July, 2006

In war, do mass and materiel matter most? Will states with the largest, best equipped, information-technology-rich militaries invariably win? The prevailing answer today among both scholars and policymakers is yes. But this is to overlook force employment, or the doctrine and tactics by which materiel is actually used. In a landmark reconception of battle and war, this book provides a systematic account of how force employment interacts with materiel to produce real combat outcomes. Stephen Biddle argues that force employment is central to modern war, becoming increasingly important since 1900 as the key to surviving ever more lethal weaponry. Technological change produces opposite effects depending on how forces are employed; to focus only on materiel is thus to risk major error--with serious consequences for both policy and scholarship.

In clear, fluent prose, Biddle provides a systematic account of force employment's role and shows how this account holds up under rigorous, multimethod testing. The results challenge a wide variety of standard views, from current expectations for a revolution in military affairs to mainstream scholarship in international relations and orthodox interpretations of modern military history.

Military Power will have a resounding impact on both scholarship in the field and on policy debates over the future of warfare, the size of the military, and the makeup of the defense budget.

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Modern Strategy

Modern Strategy

by C. Gray

Oxford University Press
432 Pages
Published November, 1999

Modern Strategy explains the permanent nature, but ever changing character, of strategy in light of the whole strategic experience of the twentieth century. The book is a major contribution to the general theory of strategy; it makes sense of the strategic history of the twentieth century, and provides understanding of what that strategic history implies for the century to come.

The book offers a uniquely comprehensive analysis of the different facets of modern strategy. The classic writings of Carl von Clausewitz are reconsidered for their continuing relevance, while possible successors are appraised. In addition to arguing that Clausewitz figured out what strategy was, and how it worked, the book probes deeply into strategy's political, ethical, and cultural dimension. The book explains how strategic behaviour in the twentieth century has expanded from the two-dimensional world of the land and the surface of the sea, to include the ocean depths, the air, space, and most recently the 'cyberspace' environments. It also offers details analyses both of nuclear matters and of the realm of irregular violence.

This is the first comprehensive account of all aspects of modern strategy since the Cold War ended and will be essential reading for all students of modern strategy and security studies.

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Supreme Command: Soldiers, Statesmen and Leadership in Wartime

Supreme Command: Soldiers, Statesmen and Leadership in Wartime

by E. Cohen

Anchor Books
320 Pages
Published September 9, 2003

The orthodoxy regarding the relationship between politicians and military leaders in wartime democracies contends that politicians should declare a military operation's objectives and then step aside and leave the business of war to the military. In this timely and controversial examination of civilian-military relations in wartime democracies, Eliot A. Cohen chips away at this time-honored belief with case studies of statesmen who dared to prod, provoke, and even defy their military officers to great effect.

Using the leadership of Abraham Lincoln, Georges Clemenceau, Winston Churchill, and David Ben-Gurion to build his argument, Cohen offers compelling proof that, as Clemenceau put it, "War is too important to leave to the generals." By examining the shared leadership traits of four politicians who triumphed in extraordinarily varied military campaigns, Cohen argues that active statesmen make the best wartime leaders, pushing their military subordinates to succeed where they might have failed if left to their own devices. Thought provoking and soundly argued, Cohen's Supreme Command is essential reading not only for military and political players but also for informed citizens and anyone interested in leadership.

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Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln

Team of Rivals: The Political Genius of Abraham Lincoln

by D. Goodwin

Simon and Schuster
944 Pages
Published October, 2012

This brilliant multiple biography is centered on Lincoln's mastery of men and how it shaped the most significant presidency in the nation's history.

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The Federalist Papers

The Federalist Papers

by A. Hamilton

Signet Classics
688 Pages
Published April 1, 2003

Written at a time when furious arguments were raging about the best way to govern America, The Federalist Papers had the immediate practical aim of persuading New Yorkers to accept the newly drafted Constitution in 1787. In this they were supremely successful, but their influence also transcended contemporary debate to win them a lasting place in discussions of American political theory. Acclaimed by Thomas Jefferson as "the best commentary on the principles of government which ever was written," The Federalist Papers make a powerful case for power-sharing between State and Federal authorities and have only risen in legal influence over the last two centuries. Beeman's analysis helps clarify the goals, at once separate and in concert, of Madison, Hamilton, and Jay during their writing, and his selections show the array of issues-both philosophical and policy-specific-covered by this body of work.

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The Guns of August

The Guns of August

by B. Tuchman

Trade Paperback.
640 Pages.
Published August 3, 2004

From the Publisher:

"More dramtatic than fiction...THE GUNS OF AUGUST is a magnificent narrative--beautifully organized, elegantly phrased, skillfully paced and sustained....The product of painstaking and sophisticated research."
CHICAGO TRIBUNE

Historian and Pulitzer Prize-winning author Barbara Tuchman has brought to life again the people and events that led up to Worl War I. With attention to fascinating detail, and an intense knowledge of her subject and its characters, Ms. Tuchman reveals, for the first time, just how the war started, why, and why it could have been stopped but wasn't. A classic historical survey of a time and a people we all need to know more about, THE GUNS OF AUGUST will not be forgotten.

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The Landmark of Thucydides

The Landmark of Thucydides

by R. Strassler

Free Press, 1 Edition
752 Pages
Published September 10, 1998

Thucydides called his account of two decades of war between Athens and Sparta "a possession for all time," and indeed it is the first and still most famous work in the Western historical tradition. Considered essential reading for generals, statesmen, and liberally educated citizens for more than 2,000 years, The Peloponnesian War is a mine of military, moral, political, and philosophical wisdom.

However, this classic book has long presented obstacles to the uninitiated reader. Robert Strassler's new edition removes these obstacles by providing a new coherence to the narrative overall, and by effectively reconstructing the lost cultural context that Thucydides shared with his original audience. Based on the venerable Richard Crawley translation, updated and revised for modern readers. The Landmark Thucydides includes a vast array of superbly designed and presented maps, brief informative appendices by outstanding classical scholars on subjects of special relevance to the text, explanatory marginal notes on each page, an index of unprecedented subtlety, and numerous other useful features.

In any list of the Great Books of Western Civilization, The Peloponnesian War stands near the top. This authoritative new edition will ensure that its greatness is appreciated by future generations.

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The Revenge of Geography

The Revenge of Geography

by R. Kaplan

Random House
432 Pages
Published September 11, 2012

In The Revenge of Geography, Kaplan builds on the insights, discoveries, and theories of great geographers and geopolitical thinkers of the near and distant past to look back at critical pivots in history and then to look forward at the evolving global scene. Kaplan traces the history of the world's hot spots by examining their climates, topographies, and proximities to other embattled lands. The Russian steppe's pitiless climate and limited vegetation bred hard and cruel men bent on destruction, for example, while Nazi geopoliticians distorted geopolitics entirely, calculating that space on the globe used by the British Empire and the Soviet Union could be swallowed by a greater German homeland.

Kaplan then applies the lessons learned to the present crises in Europe, Russia, China, the Indian subcontinent, Turkey, Iran, and the Arab Middle East. The result is a holistic interpretation of the next cycle of conflict throughout Eurasia. Remarkably, the future can be understood in the context of temperature, land allotment, and other physical certainties: China, able to feed only 23 percent of its people from land that is only 7 percent arable, has sought energy, minerals, and metals from such brutal regimes as Burma, Iran, and Zimbabwe, putting it in moral conflict with the United States. Afghanistan's porous borders will keep it the principal invasion route into India, and a vital rear base for Pakistan, India's main enemy. Iran will exploit the advantage of being the only country that straddles both energy-producing areas of the Persian Gulf and the Caspian Sea. Finally, Kaplan posits that the United States might rue engaging in far-flung conflicts with Iraq and Afghanistan rather than tending to its direct neighbor Mexico, which is on the verge of becoming a semifailed state due to drug cartel carnage.

A brilliant rebuttal to thinkers who suggest that globalism will trump geography, this indispensable work shows how timeless truths and natural facts can help prevent this century's looming cataclysms.

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Categories


Aviation

100 Years of Marine Corps Aviation: An Illustrated History

100 Years of Marine Corps Aviation: An Illustrated History

by R. Kaufman


Hammer From Above: Marine Air Combat Over Iraq

Hammer From Above: Marine Air Combat Over Iraq

by J. Stout

Random House
416 Pages
Published December 26, 2006

In Operation Iraqi Freedom, the Marine Corps' ground campaign up the Tigris and Euphrates was notable for speed and aggressiveness unparalleled in military history. Little has been written, however, of the air support that guaranteed the drive's success. Paving the way for the rush to Baghdad was "the hammer from above"-in the form of attack helicopters, jet fighters, transport, and other support aircraft. Now a former Marine fighter pilot shares the gripping never-before-told stories of the Marines who helped bring to an end the regime of Saddam Hussein.

As Jay Stout reveals, the air war had actually been in the planning stages ever since the victory of Operation Desert Storm, twelve years earlier. But when Operation Iraqi Freedom officially commenced on March 20, 2003, the Marine Corps entered the fight with an aviation arm at its smallest since before World War II. Still, with the motto "Speed Equals Success," the separate air and ground units acted as a team to get the job done.

Drawing on exclusive interviews with the men and women who flew the harrowing missions, Hammer from Above reveals how pilots and their machines were tested to the limits of endurance, venturing well beyond what they were trained and designed to do. Stout takes us into the cockpits, revealing what it was like to fly these intense combat operations for up to eighteen hours at a time and to face incredible volumes of fire that literally shredded aircraft in midair during battles like that over An Nasiriyah.

With its dynamic descriptions of perilous flights and bombing runs, Hammer from Above is a worthy tribute to the men and women who flew and maintained the aircraft that so inspired their brothers in arms and terrified the enemy.

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Marine Air: The History of the Flying Leathernecks in Words and Photos

Marine Air: The History of the Flying Leathernecks in Words and Photos

by R. Dorr


On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War over Vietnam

On Yankee Station: The Naval Air War over Vietnam

by J. Nichols

University of Michigan Library
224 Pages
Published January 1, 1987

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The Art of Airpower, Sun Tzu Revisited

The Art of Airpower, Sun Tzu Revisited

by S. Kainikara


The Naval Air War in Korea

The Naval Air War in Korea

by R. Hallion

University of Alabama Press
256 Pages
Published 2011

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U.S. Marine Corps Aviation Since 1912

U.S. Marine Corps Aviation Since 1912

by P. Mersky


Logistics

Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army

Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army

by D. Engels

University of California Press
208Pages
Published December, 1980

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Clockspeed

Clockspeed

by C. Fine

Basic Books
288 Pages
Published September 21, 1999

In business today, all advantage is temporary. In order to survive-let alone thrive-companies must be able to anticipate and adapt to change, or face rapid, brutal extinction. In Clockspeed, Charles Fine draws on a decade's worth of research at M.I.T.'s Sloan School of Management to introduce a new vocabulary for understanding the forces of competition and making strategic decisions that will determine the destiny of your company, as well as your industry.Taking inspiration from the world of biology, Fine argues that each industry has its own evolutionary life cycle (or "clockspeed"), measured by the rate at which it introduces new products, processes, and organizational structures. Just as geneticists study the fruit fly to gain insight into the evolutionary paths of all animals, managers in any industry can learn from the industrial fruit flies-such as Internet services, personal computers, and multimedia entertainment-which evolve through new generations at breakneck speed. Applying the lessons of the fruit flies to industries as diverse as bicycles, pharmaceuticals, and semiconductors, Fine illustrates how competitive advantage is lost or gained by how well a company manages dynamic web of relationships that run throughout its chain of suppliers, distributors, and alliance partners.Packed with revolutionary concepts and tools to help managers make key strategic decisions that affect current and future performance, Clockspeed shows, as no other book before it, how the ultimate core competency is mastering the art of supply chain design, carefully choosing which components and capabilities to keep in-house and which to purchase from outside.The consequences of faulty of visionary decisions can be enormous and dramatic. Witness the case of IBM in the early 1980s, when it outsourced key PC components to Microsoft and Intel, unleashing the "Intel Inside" phenomenon and a complete restructuring of the computer industry. Going further, Fine sees the personal computer as merely a component in the vast information-entertainment industry, which evolves at speeds unimagined a few years ago. He uses this "fruit fly" as well to peer into the future of industrial evolution and find practical advice for players in all industries, from automobiles to health care information systems.Clockspeed not only serves up some new "laws" of value chain dynamics, but it also offers recommendations for achieving industry leadership through simultaneous product, process, and supply chain design. In challenging managers to think like corporate geneticists Clockspeed contributes the next creative leap in business strategy.

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Feeding Mars: Logistics in Western Warfare from the Middle Ages to the Present

Feeding Mars: Logistics in Western Warfare from the Middle Ages to the Present

by J. Lynn


Keep from All Thoughtful Men: How U.S. Economists Won WWII

Keep from All Thoughtful Men: How U.S. Economists Won WWII

by J. Lacey

Naval Institute Press
288 Pages
Published April 2011

This ground-breaking work overturns accepted historical dogma on how World War II strategy was planned and implemented. Refuting the long-accepted notion that the avalanche of munitions which poured forth from American factories defeated the Axis powers, it examines exactly how this miracle of production was organized and integrated into Allied strategy and operations. In doing so, it is the first book to show how revolutions in statistics and finance forever changed the nature of war, overturning three millennia of the making of grand strategy. Jim Lacey argues that manpower and the capacity to produce more munitions gave out long before the money did.

While the book relates the overall story of how economics dictated war planning at the highest levels, more specifically it tells how three obscure economists came to have more influence on the conduct of the war than the Joint Chiefs. Lacey further contends that the nation's basic strategy, known as the Victory Plan, had nothing to do with Gen. Albert Wedemeyer, despite the general's widely accepted claims that he formulated the plan. The author also is the first to correct to a long-standing fallacy that Army Chief of Staff Gen. George Marshall went to the Casablanca conference determined to push hard for a 1943 invasion of Northern Europe. A check of the conference minutes proved that the Army's official history purposely left out important information or misquoted the principals, according to Lacey, and that the idea of a 1943 invasion had been given up months before. He also makes extensive use of recently uncovered documents and histories written by members of the Joint staff that Lacey discovered misfiled in the National Archives. This first full study of the civil-military fight offers an entirely new perspective of World War II.

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Pacific Express: The Critical Role of Military Logistics In WWII

Pacific Express: The Critical Role of Military Logistics In WWII

by W. McGee

BMC Publications
560 Pages
Published 2009

Victory is won or lost in battle, but all military history shows that adequate logistics support is essential to the winning of the battle. In World War II, 16.1 million men and women served in the U.S. Armed Forces. For every ONE who served in combat, TEN served in a support role.

The third volume of William L. McGee's series is dedicated to the men and women - military and civilian - who served in logistical support roles for the front line combat personnel in WWII. The story of the vital logistics services supporting the U.S. Armed Forces operating in the Pacific is told-proof positive that warfare is not all blazing combat.

Now under one cover, an edited collection of the best works by noted military historians on the importance of military logistics in WWII. The editors profile many of the major components that made up the "Pacific express" including:

  • U.S. Navy Seabees and U.S. Marine Corps Engineers who built the Advance Bases.
  • U.S. Navy crews who manned the amphibious force and Fleet's floating mobile Service Squadrons throughout the vast reaches of the Pacific.
  • U.S. Merchant Marine and U.S. Naval Armed Guard who manned and defended the thousands of War Shipping Administration cargo ships, transports, and tankers to "Deliver the goods!"
  • U.S. Army and civilian (civil service) Transportation Corps personnel who operated most of the Army's large and small vessels, but were seldom covered by the consumer-oriented media during WWII.
  • U.S. Coast Guardsmen who manned hundreds of U.S. Army and Navy long-haul vessels and thousands of battle-loaded amphibious landing ships and craft.

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Recurring Logistic Problems as I Have Observed Them

Recurring Logistic Problems as I Have Observed Them

by C. Magruder


Supplying War

Supplying War

by M. van Creveld

Cambridge University Press
300 Pages
Published MArch, 2004

Drawing on a very wide range of unpublished and previously unexploited sources, Martin van Creveld examines the "nuts and bolts" of war. He considers the formidable problems of movement and supply, transportation and administration, often mentioned (but rarely explored) by the vast majority of books on military history. By concentrating on logistics rather than on the more traditional tactics and strategy, van Creveld is also able to offer an original reinterpretation of military history.

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Counterinsurgency

Counterinsurgency Warfare

Counterinsurgency Warfare

by D. Galula

Paperback.
128 Pages.
Publish Date: August 2006

From the Publisher:

This book examines the strategy and means to defeat insurgenct or guerrilla movements based on the author's first-hand experience in China, Greece, Indochina, and Algeria.

This volume in the Praeger Security International (PSI) series Classics of the Counterinsurgency Era defines the laws of insurgency and outlines the strategy and tactics to combat such threats. Drawn from the observations of a French officer, David Galula, who witnessed guerrilla warfare on three continents, the book remains relevant today as American policymakers, military analysts, and members of the public look to the counterinsurgency era of the 1960s for lessons to apply to the current situation in Iraq and Afghanistan. With a new foreword by John A. Nagl, author of Counterinsurgency Lessons from Malaya and Vietnam (Praeger, 2002).

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Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife

Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife

by J. Nagl and P. Schoomaker

280 Pages
University of Chicago Press
Published 2005

Invariably, armies are accused of preparing to fight the previous war. In Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife, Lieutenant Colonel John A. Nagl-a veteran of both Operation Desert Storm and the current conflict in Iraq-considers the now-crucial question of how armies adapt to changing circumstances during the course of conflicts for which they are initially unprepared. Through the use of archival sources and interviews with participants in both engagements, Nagl compares the development of counterinsurgency doctrine and practice in the Malayan Emergency from 1948 to 1960 with what developed in the Vietnam War from 1950 to 1975.

In examining these two events, Nagl-the subject of a recent New York Times Magazine cover story by Peter Maass-argues that organizational culture is key to the ability to learn from unanticipated conditions, a variable which explains why the British army successfully conducted counterinsurgency in Malaya but why the American army failed to do so in Vietnam, treating the war instead as a conventional conflict. Nagl concludes that the British army, because of its role as a colonial police force and the organizational characteristics created by its history and national culture, was better able to quickly learn and apply the lessons of counterinsurgency during the course of the Malayan Emergency.

With a new preface reflecting on the author's combat experience in Iraq, Learning to Eat Soup with a Knife is a timely examination of the lessons of previous counterinsurgency campaigns that will be hailed by both military leaders and interested civilians.

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Street Without Joy

Street Without Joy

by B. Fall

416 Pages
Stackpole Books
Published 2005

Originally published in 1961, before the United States escalated its involvement in South Vietnam, Street without Joy offered a clear warning about what American forces would face in the jungles of Southeast Asia: a costly and protracted revolutionary war fought without fronts against a mobile enemy. In harrowing detail, Fall describes the brutality and frustrations of the Indochina War, the savage eight-year conflict-ending in 1954 after the fall of Dien Bien Phu-in which French forces suffered a staggering defeat at the hands of Communist-led Vietnamese nationalists. With its frontline perspective, vivid reporting, and careful analysis, Street without Joy was required reading for policymakers in Washington and GIs in the field and is now considered a classic.

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The Accidental Guerilla

The Accidental Guerilla

by D. Kilcullen

384 Pages
Oxford University Press
Published March, 2011

David Kilcullen is one of the world's most influential experts on counterinsurgency and modern warfare, a ground-breaking theorist whose ideas "are revolutionizing military thinking throughout the west" (Washington Post). Indeed, his vision of modern warfare powerfully influenced America's decision to rethink its military strategy in Iraq and implement "the Surge," now recognized as a dramatic success.

In The Accidental Guerrilla, Kilcullen provides a remarkably fresh perspective on the War on Terror. Kilcullen takes us "on the ground" to uncover the face of modern warfare, illuminating both the big global war (the "War on Terrorism") and its relation to the associated "small wars" across the globe: Iraq, Afghanistan, Indonesia, Thailand, the Pakistani tribal zones, East Timor and the horn of Africa. Kilcullen sees today's conflicts as a complex interweaving of contrasting trends--local insurgencies seeking autonomy caught up in a broader pan-Islamic campaign--small wars in the midst of a big one. He warns that America's actions in the war on terrorism have tended to conflate these trends, blurring the distinction between local and global struggles and thus enormously complicating our challenges. Indeed, the US had done a poor job of applying different tactics to these very different situations, continually misidentifying insurgents with limited aims and legitimate grievances--whom he calls "accidental guerrillas"--as part of a coordinated worldwide terror network. We must learn how to disentangle these strands, develop strategies that deal with global threats, avoid local conflicts where possible, and win them where necessary.

Colored with gripping battlefield experiences that range from the jungles and highlands of Southeast Asia to the mountains of the Afghanistan-Pakistan border to the dusty towns of the Middle East, The Accidental Guerrilla will, quite simply, change the way we think about war. This book is a must read for everyone concerned about the war on terror.

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The Village

by B. West


War Comes to Long An

War Comes to Long An

by J. Race

368 Pages
University of California Press
Published February, 2010

This landmark study of the Vietnamese conflict, examined through the lens of the revolutionary and counter-revolutionary movements in the rural province of Long An up until American intervention in the area, offers a human, balanced, penetrating account of war. Two new forewords by Robert K. Brigham of Vassar College and Jeffrey Record of the Air War College explore the book's enduring influence. A new end chapter offers previously unpublished scholarship on the conflict

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Roots of Maneuver Warfare

Airpower and Maneuver Warfare

Airpower and Maneuver Warfare

by M. van Creveld

284 Pages
Create Space Independent Publishing Platform
Published August 1, 2012

The authors identify and discuss the fundamental concepts and principles of maneuver warfare, compare and contrast it to attrition-style warfare, and trace its origins and history. They examine the role of airpower in enhancing maneuver during the early German campaigns of World War II, in Germany's 1941 Russian campaigns, and in the Soviet version of maneuver warfare in World War II. They analyze the importance of airpower in maneuver warfare employed by Israel in the 1967 and 1973 wars and by coalition forces in the Gulf War. Dr. van Creveld forecasts what the role of airpower will be in warfare during the coming years. The book includes a response to the authors by the air doctrine analysts at Air University.

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Assault from the Sea: Essays on the History of Amphibious Warfare

Assault from the Sea: Essays on the History of Amphibious Warfare

by M. Bartlett

480 Pages
Naval Institute Press
Published September, 1985

This collection of 51 essays provides a history of amphibious landings that include European, Asian, and American operations. It describes in detail some of history's most significant amphibious assaults, as well as planned attacks that were never carried out.

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Maneuver Warfare

Maneuver Warfare

by G. Galvin and R. Hooker


Maneuver Warfare Handbook

Maneuver Warfare Handbook

by W. Lind

52 Pages
Westview Press
Trade Paperback
Published August, 1985

Maneuver warfare, often controversial and requiring operational and tactical innovation, poses perhaps the most important doctrinal questions currently facing the conventional military forces of the U.S. Its purpose is to defeat the enemy by disrupting the opponent's ability to react, rather than by physical destruction of forces. This book develops and explains the theory of maneuver warfare and offers specific tactical, operational, and organizational recommendations for improving ground combat forces. The authors translate into concrete doctrine concepts that are too often vaguely stated by manuever warfare advocates. Although the book uses the Marine Corps as a model, the concepts, tactics, and doctrine discussed apply to any ground combat force.

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The U.S. Marines and Amphibious War: Its Theory and Practice in the Pacific

The U.S. Marines and Amphibious War: Its Theory and Practice in the Pacific

by J. Isley and P. Crowl


Wounded Warrior

Ascent

Ascent

by B. McGhie

220 Pages
Ruder-Finn Press
Published June, 2007

In this autobiography, Bruce McGhie writes of his life, love and accomplishments as a man dealing with quadriplegia in a pre-handicap accessible world. After a tragic Air Force training accident at the age of twenty-two left him critically injured and completely dependent on others, McGhie struggled through painful and frustrating rehab with little prospect of ever leading a "normal" life.

During the agonizing recuperation and relearning process inherent to spinal cord injuries, he faced a variety of challenges, from basics such as getting dressed, driving with hand controls, and gaining full physical independence to necessary real-world skills like getting up curbs with no cuts and using inaccessible bathrooms and public telephones. McGhie not only overcame these obstacles and achieved the "impossible"-a virtually normal life-but also dared to strive for the extraordinary, succeeding in such endeavors as building up a successful business consultancy and becoming the first spinal-cord injured person in the world to be licensed as a glider pilot, using hand controls he helped develop.

A compelling story, ASCENT: How one quadriplegic fought for a full life and soared strives to illuminate the amazing accomplishments of one man and his highly supportive wife while also providing an example of the inherent power people have to transcend handicaps-physical or otherwise-and live full and meaningful lives.

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Courage After Fire: Coping Strategies for Troops Returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and Their families

Courage After Fire: Coping Strategies for Troops Returning from Iraq and Afghanistan and Their families

by K. Armstrong, S. Best, and P. Domenici

248 Pages
Ulysses Press
Published January, 2006

Offers a comprehensive guide to dealing with the repercussions of combat duty, including posttraumatic stress symptoms, anxiety, depression and substance abuse.

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Down Range: To Iraq and Back

Down Range: To Iraq and Back

by B. Cantrell and C. Dean

Bridget C. Cantrell, Ph.D. and Vietnam veteran, Chuck Dean have joined forces to present this vital information and resource manual for both returning troops and their loved ones. Here you will find answers, explanations, and insights as to why so many combat veterans suffer from flashbacks, depression, fits of rage, nightmares, anxiety, emotional numbing, and other troubling aspects of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD).

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Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming

Odysseus in America: Combat Trauma and the Trials of Homecoming

by J. Shay

352 Pages
Trade Paperback
Scribner Press
Published November 4, 2003

In this ambitious follow-up to Achilles in Vietnam, Dr. Jonathan Shay uses the Odyssey, the story of a soldier's homecoming, to illuminate the pitfalls that trap many veterans on the road back to civilian life. Seamlessly combining important psychological work and brilliant literary interpretation with an impassioned plea to renovate American military institutions, Shay deepens our understanding of both the combat veteran's experience and one of the world's greatest classics.

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Once a Warrior Always a Warrior: Navigating the Transition from Combat to Home

Once a Warrior Always a Warrior: Navigating the Transition from Combat to Home

by C. Hoge

328 Pages
Globe Pequot Press
Published February 23, 2010

Col. Charles W. Hoge, M.D., has made it his life's work to help soldiers deal with the mental health repercussions of war and is an advocate for veterans and for eradicating the stigma of receiving mental health care in the military. With this book, Dr. Hoge reaches out to a larger community of veterans and their families, helping family members to gain greater understanding of ways they can help their loved ones navigate the "PTSD paradox" while also helping veterans cope with combat stress and PTSD through a set of specific skills.

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Once a Warrior: Wired for Life

Once a Warrior: Wired for Life

by B. Cantrell and C. Dean

Published February 23, 2010

The authors, Dr. Bridget Cantrell and Chuck Dean, (also of the critically acclaimed book on PTSD, Downrange to Iraq), have once again written a self-help guide that will assist the families of Warriors understand "why" the civilian world is tough for anyone who has been in combat (downrange). The book will guide the Warrior through different scenarious, validate the feelings and emotions and difficulties they face at homecoming, and provide them with practical, useful suggestions for living life as a civilian. The authors take this one step further by encouraging our Warriors to make good use of their military skills outside the military--yes, even infantrymen have skills and qualities that will be useful in civilian professions.

Recommended Reading for ALL families, Marines and Healthcare Professionals

From the Founder of MarineParents.com, Tracy Della Vecchia

I picked up this book one night and read it in full, in one sitting, cover to cover. I knew it would be a quality book and hoped it would give me additional insight for families that call the office with questions and concerns about their sons and daughters returning from combat and transitioning out of the Marine Corps.

The book was beyond my expectations. I finally "get it". I finally understand that our sons and daughters will all have a tough time returning to civilian life--they don't have to have PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder) or COS (Combat Operational Stress) to have concerns about returning home and adjusting back to a civilian lifestyle. And I understand why now. That knowledge and understanding will help me help other families, and most importantly, help me to help my son.

Once a Warrior: Wired for Life should be required reading for military personnel from the privates to the commanding officers, for every family member, and for anyone in the healthcare profession treating or talking with military personnel and veterans from current conflicts and past conflicts. Buy the book, read it, pass it on, and encourage others to do the same. Share the knowledge you will learn from it. This is the best way I know to support our troops.

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Overcoming Post-Deployment Syndrome: A Six Step Mission to Health

Overcoming Post-Deployment Syndrome: A Six Step Mission to Health

by D. Cifu and C. Blake

Published March 15, 2011

A comprehensive guide for servicemembers, Veterans and their families dealing with the all-too-common repercussions of combat duty, including traumatic brain injury, post-traumatic stress disorder, anxiety, depression, chronic pain and musculoskeletal injury, and substance abuse. It offers a practical blend of state-of-the-art traditional and holistic medicine, and teaches the value of mindfulness, movement, psychotherapeutic, and creative arts practices, as well as active engagement and partnership with clinicians in one's own health care. The men and women of the Armed Services have trained in the art of war. This book offers training in the art of healing. Those that learn, understand, and apply the principles within will discover that warriors can excel at both the art of war and the art of healing.

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Shadow of the Sword

Shadow of the Sword

by J. Workman

280 Pages
University of Nebraska Press
Published April, 2012

Staff Sergeant Jeremiah Workman is one of the Marine Corps's best-known contemporary combat veterans. In this searing and inspiring memoir, he tells an unforgettable story of his service overseas-and of the emotional wars that continue long after fighting soldiers come home.

In the Iraqi city of Fallujah in December 2004, Workman faced the challenge that would change his life. He and his platoon came upon a building in which insurgents had trapped their fellow Marines. Leading repeated assaults on that building, Workman killed more than twenty of the enemy in a firefight that left three of his own men dead.

But Workman's most difficult fight lay ahead, in the battlefield of his mind. He returned stateside, was awarded the Navy Cross for gallantry under fire, and was then assigned to the Marine base at Parris Island as a drill instructor. Haunted by the thought that he had failed his men overseas, Workman suffered a psychological breakdown in front of the soldiers he was charged with preparing for war.

In Shadow of the Sword, a memoir that brilliantly captures both wartime courage and its lifelong consequences, Workman candidly reveals the ordeal of post-traumatic stress.

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Soft Spots: A Marine

Soft Spots: A Marine"s Memoir of Combat and Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

by C. Van Winkle

224 pages
Publisher: St. Martin's Press

Written by a Marine with first-hand experience, this book takes the reader through an incredible narrative of Marines in a combat zone in Iraq. It bounces back and forth between the past and Van Winkle's return stateside showing the reader the trials and traumas associated with both lifestyles, while vividly displaying the struggles to regain control of his mind and the grip of PTSD (Post Traumatic Stress Disorder).

"Nothing gets held back in Soft Spots...lacerating honesty, the narrative is dreamlike and surreal."
--The Washington Post

"[Van Winkle's] book describes his spiral from the inanity of war to the insanity of the world-weary...Happy trails? No. Trauma? Yes, this is how one veteran carries his war."
--Marine Corps Times

"Van Winkle's detailed account of how combat shattered his mind is as disturbing as his war imagery."
--Washington City Paper

"The emotional impact of this memoir will reside with you long after the final page is turned."
--North County Outlook (WA)

"A brutally honest account of war and its aftermath"
--The Virginian-Pilot

"[Van Winkle] gives voice to the thousands of forgotten soldiers returning home from Iraq, or those whose souls are still stuck there. He gives us his poor haunted head, only mapped out and numbered, and the effect will make you weep."
--The Post and Courier (Charleston, S.C.)

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Unbroken: A WWII Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

Unbroken: A WWII Story of Survival, Resilience, and Redemption

by L. Hillenbrand

496 Pages
Random House
Published November 16, 2010

On a May afternoon in 1943, an Army Air Forces bomber crashed into the Pacific Ocean and disappeared, leaving only a spray of debris and a slick of oil, gasoline, and blood. Then, on the ocean surface, a face appeared. It was that of a young lieutenant, the plane's bombardier, who was struggling to a life raft and pulling himself aboard. So began one of the most extraordinary odysseys of the Second World War.

The lieutenant's name was Louis Zamperini. In boyhood, he'd been a cunning and incorrigible delinquent, breaking into houses, brawling, and fleeing his home to ride the rails. As a teenager, he had channeled his defiance into running, discovering a prodigious talent that had carried him to the Berlin Olympics and within sight of the four-minute mile. But when war had come, the athlete had become an airman, embarking on a journey that led to his doomed flight, a tiny raft, and a drift into the unknown.

Ahead of Zamperini lay thousands of miles of open ocean, leaping sharks, a foundering raft, thirst and starvation, enemy aircraft, and, beyond, a trial even greater. Driven to the limits of endurance, Zamperini would answer desperation with ingenuity; suffering with hope, resolve, and humor; brutality with rebellion. His fate, whether triumph or tragedy, would be suspended on the fraying wire of his will.

In her long-awaited new book, Laura Hillenbrand writes with the same rich and vivid narrative voice she displayed in Seabiscuit. Telling an unforgettable story of a man's journey into extremity, Unbroken is a testament to the resilience of the human mind, body, and spirit.

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War and the Soul: Healing Our Nation

War and the Soul: Healing Our Nation"s Veterans from Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder

by E. Tick

341 Pages
Quest Books
Published December 30, 2005

The New England Journal of Medicine reports that 16 percent (one in eight) of returning Iraq veterans suffer from post-traumatic stress disorder. Such vets typically can't hold jobs. They are incapable of intimacy, creative work, and self-realization. Some can't leave the house because they are afraid they will kill or be killed.

The key to healing, says psychotherapist Ed Tick, is in how we understand PTSD. In war's overwhelming violence, the soul-the true self-flees and can become lost for life. He redefines PTSD as a true identity disorder, with radical implications for therapy. First, Tick establishes the traditional context of war in mythology and religion. Then he describes in depth PTSD in terms of identity issues. Finally, drawing on world spiritual traditions, he presents ways to nurture a positive identity based in compassion and forgiveness.

War and the Soul will change the way we think about war, for veterans and for all those who love and want to help them. It shows how to make the wounded soul whole again. When this work is achieved, PTSD vanishes and the veteran can truly return home.

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Warrior Mindset

Warrior Mindset

by M. Asken, L. Christensen, D. Grossman

256 Pages
Human Factor Research Group
Published January, 2010

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What It Is Like to Go to War

What It Is Like to Go to War

by K. Marlantes

Marine mom and founder of MarineParents.com reviews this book in detail:

"As the parent of a young Marine off to combat for the first time in 2003, I was stricken with grief over the "what-ifs" while at the same time fiercely proud of my son. At times I was taken aback by my own curiosity of what he would be experiencing. More than once I wondered, "What is it like to go to war?" I wanted to know, but at the same time I was afraid to know. Nonetheless, I began a journey to learn as much as possible and determine how I would help my son if the "what-ifs" came to be. It's a road I had to travel, and it's a road I continue to travel even eight years later.

At first glance I thought Karl Marlantes' new book, What It Is Like to Go to War, would not be for me because he was a Vietnam combat veteran, even though it appeared to be a direct answer to my question. My son went to Iraq, and those two conflicts, in my opinion, were vastly different. I was completely wrong. The author has, in a timeless fashion, intertwined his past battle experiences with the battles veterans face with when returning home. Marlantes' book will enlighten military service members and families for years to come.

One Sunday I picked up the book for just a quick glance over morning coffee. I read the first page and knew I wasn't going anywhere that day. I was instantly intrigued and read the book cover to cover, stopping only to take a break for lunch and share what I was learning with my husband. I learned about my father, a Vietnam veteran; I learned about my son, a three-time Iraq veteran; and surprisingly, I learned about myself.

Karl Marlantes fuses ancient history and the philosophies of war with his experiences in combat to consider how warriors today can mentally and spiritually prepare for combat. Some parts of the book are graphic, but they are not sensationalized just for the sake of selling a book. The graphic imagery the author presents is necessary for readers to understand the emotions his battle experiences evoked for him at the time, the emotions he experienced two years later, and the emotions he continues to face more than 40 years later.

Lots of folks will benefit from reading this book. The author suggests that young people who are considering enlisting read the book first. I recommend it for all military personnel and anyone who comes in contact with a combat veteran whether they are a family member or a co-worker. But most importantly, this book is essential reading for parents of the 18-year-olds who will be shipped off to a combat zone or otherwise faced with the consequences of combat. Marlantes presents front and center the real cost of war, the one that weighs heaviest on the minds of the mothers and fathers of these brave warriors. That cost is the mental and spiritual health of our sons and daughters as they struggle with the consequential demons that will follow them through the years. Our sons and daughters are well-trained to go into combat, but they are not trained for combating the effects battle will have on their spirit and emotional well-being.

This book is a road map for the journey we're all on to understand what our kids are going through. This book helps you "get it" and by "getting it" you'll be able to recognize and possibly assist when your loved one faces the atrocities war can cause to the human psyche.

And as a bonus, the book is enjoyable to read. I was entertained. I laughed. I cried. I read it in a day and couldn't put it down. I don't give up my Sundays easily, but this book had me.

What it is Like to Go to War is destined to become a timeless treasure for our military men and women and just as importantly their family members, employers, health professionals and anyone with a combat veteran in their lives. Kudos to the author, and Semper Fi Marine."


-Tracy Della Vecchia, Founder of MarineParents.com, Inc.

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Strategic Thinking

Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life

Critical Thinking: Tools for Taking Charge of Your Professional and Personal Life

by R. Paul and L. Elder


General System Theory

General System Theory

by L. Von Bartalanffy

296 Pages
George Braziller, Inc.
Published March, 1969

Gathered here are Ludwig von Bertalanffy's writings on general system theory, selected and edited to show the evolution of systems theory and to present its applications to problem solving. An attempt to formulate common laws that apply to virtually every scientific field, this conceptual approach has had a profound impact on such widely diverse disciplines as biology, economics, demography, and psychology. A German-Canadian biologist and philosopher, von Bertalanffy (1901-1972) was the creator and echief exponent of general system theory.

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Harnessing Complexity

Harnessing Complexity

by R. Axelrod and M. Cohen

208 Pages
Basic Books
Published August 2, 2001

Harnessing Complexity will be indispensable to anyone who wants to better comprehend how people and organizations can adapt effectively in the information age. This book is a step-by-step guide to understanding the processes of variation, interaction, and selection that are at work in all organizations. The authors show how to use their own paradigm of "bottom up" management, the Complex Adaptive System-whether in science, public policy, or private commerce. This simple model of how people work together will change forever how we think about getting things done in a group."Harnessing Complexity distills the managerial essence of current research on complexity. A very valuable contribution to the emerging theory of competition and competitive advantage."-C.K. Prahalad, University of Michigan, coauthor of Competing for the Future"A brilliant exposition that demystifies both the theory and use of Complex Adaptive Systems."-John Seely Brown, Xerox Corporation and Palo Alto Research Center

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Rethinking the Principles of War

Rethinking the Principles of War

by A. McIvor

592 Pages
Naval Institute Press
Published October, 2005

This work features the fresh thinking of twenty-eight leading authors from a variety of military and national security disciplines. Following an introduction by Lt. Gen. James Dubik, Commander I Corps, U.S. Army, the anthology first considers the general question of whether there is a distinctly American way of war. Dr. Colin Gray's opening essay "The American Way of War: Critique and Implications" provides a state of the question perspective. Sections on operational art, with writers addressing the issues in both conventional and small wars; stability and reconstruction; and intelligence complete the volume. Among the well-known contributors are Robert Scales, Mary Kaldor, Ralph Peters, Jon Sumida, Grant Hammond, Milan Vego, and T.X. Hammes. The anthology is part of a larger Rethinking the Principles project, sponsored by the Office of Force Transformation and the U.S. Navy to examine approaches to the future of warfare. Footnotes, index, and a bibliographic essay make the work a useful tool for students of war and general readers alike.

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The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable

The Black Swan: The Impact of the Highly Improbable

by N. Taleb

480 Pages
Random House Trade Paperbacks
Published May 11, 2010

A black swan is an event, positive or negative, that is deemed improbable yet causes massive consequences. In this groundbreaking and prophetic book, Taleb shows in a playful way that Black Swan events explain almost everything about our world, and yet we-especially the experts-are blind to them. In this second edition, Taleb has added a new essay, On Robustness and Fragility, which offers tools to navigate and exploit a Black Swan world.

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The Copernican Revolution

The Copernican Revolution

by T. Kuhn

320 Pages
Harvard University Press
Published January, 1992

For scientist and layman alike this book provides vivid evidence that the Copernican Revolution has by no means lost its significance today. Few episodes in the development of scientific theory show so clearly how the solution to a highly technical problem can alter our basic thought processes and attitudes. Understanding the processes which underlay the Revolution gives us a perspective, in this scientific age, from which to evaluate our own beliefs more intelligently. With a constant keen awareness of the inseparable mixture of its technical, philosophical, and humanistic elements, Thomas S. Kuhn displays the full scope of the Copernican Revolution as simultaneously an episode in the internal development of astronomy, a critical turning point in the evolution of scientific thought, and a crisis in Western man's concept of his relation to the universe and to God.

The book begins with a description of the first scientific cosmology developed by the Greeks. Mr. Kuhn thus prepares the way for a continuing analysis of the relation between theory and observation and belief. He describes the many functions-astronomical, scientific, and nonscientific-of the Greek concept of the universe, concentrating especially on the religious implications. He then treats the intellectual, social, and economic developments which nurtured Copernicus' break with traditional astronomy. Although many of these developments, including scholastic criticism of Aristotle's theory of motion and the Renaissance revival of Neoplatonism, lie entirely outside of astronomy, they increased the flexibility of the astronomer's imagination. That new flexibility is apparent in the work of Copernicus, whose De Revolutionibus Orbium Coelestium (On the Revolutions of the Heavenly Spheres) is discussed in detail both for its own significance and as a representative scientific innovation.

With a final analysis of Copernicus' life work-its reception and its contribution to a new scientific concept of the universe-Mr. Kuhn illuminates both the researches that finally made the heliocentric arrangement work, and the achievements in physics and metaphysics that made the planetary earth an integral part of Newtonian science. These are the developments that once again provided man with a coherent and self-consistent conception of the universe and of his own place in it.

This is a book for any reader interested in the evolution of ideas and, in particular, in the curious interplay of hypothesis and experiment which is the essence of modern science. Says James Bryant Conant in his Foreword: "Professor Kuhn's handling of the subject merits attention, for...he points the way to the road which must be followed if science is to be assimilated into the culture of our times."

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Thinking Fast and Slow

Thinking Fast and Slow

by D. Kahneman

512 Pages
Farrar, Straus, and Giroux
Published October, 2011

Daniel Kahneman, recipient of the Nobel Prize in Economic Sciences for his seminal work in psychology that challenged the rational model of judgment and decision making, is one of our most important thinkers. His ideas have had a profound and widely regarded impact on many fields-including economics, medicine, and politics-but until now, he has never brought together his many years of research and thinking in one book.

In the highly anticipated Thinking, Fast and Slow, Kahneman takes us on a groundbreaking tour of the mind and explains the two systems that drive the way we think. System 1 is fast, intuitive, and emotional; System 2 is slower, more deliberative, and more logical. Kahneman exposes the extraordinary capabilities-and also the faults and biases-of fast thinking, and reveals the pervasive influence of intuitive impressions on our thoughts and behavior. The impact of loss aversion and overconfidence on corporate strategies, the difficulties of predicting what will make us happy in the future, the challenges of properly framing risks at work and at home, the profound effect of cognitive biases on everything from playing the stock market to planning the next vacation-each of these can be understood only by knowing how the two systems work together to shape our judgments and decisions.

Engaging the reader in a lively conversation about how we think, Kahneman reveals where we can and cannot trust our intuitions and how we can tap into the benefits of slow thinking. He offers practical and enlightening insights into how choices are made in both our business and our personal lives-and how we can use different techniques to guard against the mental glitches that often get us into trouble. Thinking, Fast and Slow will transform the way you think about thinking.

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Thinking in Time: The uses of Histry for Decision Makers

Thinking in Time: The uses of Histry for Decision Makers

by R. Neustadt and E. May

352 Pages
Free Press
Published January, 1988

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Regional and Cultural Studies

Angry Wind: Through Muslim Black Africa by Truck, Bus, Boat, and Camel

Angry Wind: Through Muslim Black Africa by Truck, Bus, Boat, and Camel

by J. Tayler

272 Pages
Houghton Mifflin Harcourt
Published February 15, 2005

Hailed by Bill Bryson and the New York Times Book Review as a rising star among travel writers, Jeffrey Tayler penetrates one of the most isolated, forbidding regions on earth--the Sahel. This lower expanse of the Sahara, which marks the southern limit of Islam's reach in West and Central Africa, boasts such mythologized places as Mopti and Timbuktu, as well as Africa's poorest countries, Chad and Niger. In parts of the Sahel, hard-line Sharia law rules and slaves are still traded. Racked by lethal harmattan winds, chronic civil wars, and grim Islamic fundamentalism, it is not the ideal place for a traveler with a U.S. passport. Tayler finds genuine danger in many guises, from drunken soldiers to a thieving teenage mob. But he also encounters patience and generosity of a sort found only in Africa.

Traveling overland by the same rickety means used by the local people--tottering, overfilled buses, bush taxis with holes in the floor, disgruntled camels--he uses his fluency in French and Arabic (the region's lingua francas) to connect with them. Tayler is able to illuminate the roiling, enigmatic cultures of the Sahel as no other Western writer could.

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Eastward to Tartary: Travels in the Balkans, the Middle East, and the Caucasus

Eastward to Tartary: Travels in the Balkans, the Middle East, and the Caucasus

by R. Kaplan

384 Pages
Vintage Books
Trade Paperback
Published October, 2001

Eastward to Tartary, Robert Kaplan's first book to focus on a single region since his bestselling Balkan Ghosts, introduces readers to an explosive and little-known part of the world destined to become a tinderbox of the future.

Kaplan takes us on a spellbinding journey into the heart of a volatile region, stretching from Hungary and Romania to the far shores of the oil-rich Caspian Sea. Through dramatic stories of unforgettable characters, Kaplan illuminates the tragic history of this unstable area that he describes as the new fault line between East and West. He ventures from Turkey, Syria, and Israel to the turbulent countries of the Caucasus, from the newly rich city of Baku to the deserts of Turkmenistan and the killing fields of Armenia. The result is must reading for anyone concerned about the state of our world in the decades to come.

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Monsoon

Monsoon

by R. Kaplan

400 Pages
Random House Trade Paperbacks
Published September, 2011

On the world maps common in America, the Western Hemisphere lies front and center, while the Indian Ocean region all but disappears. This convention reveals the geopolitical focus of the now-departed twentieth century, but in the twenty-first century that focus will fundamentally change. In this pivotal examination of the countries known as "Monsoon Asia"-which include India, Pakistan, China, Indonesia, Burma, Oman, Sri Lanka, Bangladesh, and Tanzania-bestselling author Robert D. Kaplan shows how crucial this dynamic area has become to American power. It is here that the fight for democracy, energy independence, and religious freedom will be lost or won, and it is here that American foreign policy must concentrate if the United States is to remain relevant in an ever-changing world. From the Horn of Africa to the Indonesian archipelago and beyond, Kaplan exposes the effects of population growth, climate change, and extremist politics on this unstable region, demonstrating why Americans can no longer afford to ignore this important area of the world

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Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea

Nothing to Envy: Ordinary Lives in North Korea

by B. Demick

336 Pages
Spiegel & Grau Trade Paperbacks
Published September, 2010

Award-winning journalist Barbara Demick follows the lives of six North Korean citizens over fifteen years-a chaotic period that saw the death of Kim Il-sung, the rise to power of his son Kim Jong-il, and a devastating famine that killed one-fifth of the population. Demick brings to life what it means to be living under the most repressive totalitarian regime today-an Orwellian world that is by choice not connected to the Internet, where displays of affection are punished, informants are rewarded, and an offhand remark can send a person to the gulag for life. Demick takes us deep inside the country, beyond the reach of government censors, and through meticulous and sensitive reporting we see her subjects fall in love, raise families, nurture ambitions, and struggle for survival. One by one, we witness their profound, life-altering disillusionment with the government and their realization that, rather than providing them with lives of abundance, their country has betrayed them.

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The Great Arab Conquests

The Great Arab Conquests

by H. Kennedy


Understanding Arabs: A Contemporary Guide to Arab Society

Understanding Arabs: A Contemporary Guide to Arab Society

by M. Nydell

320 Pages
Nicholas Brealey Publishing
Published April 16, 2012

Now more than ever, Margaret Nydell's book Understanding Arabs is a must-read. The fifth edition of this classic introduction to Arab culture has been completely revised and updated to help readers understand the complex issues playing out on the world stage such as the Arab Spring. Understanding Arabs: A Contemporary Guide to Arab Society is a handbook accessible to everyone. Written by the highly esteemed academic Margaret Nydell, the book promotes understanding between modern-day Arabs and Westerners without pushing a political agenda.

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What Went Wrong? The Clash Between Islam and Modernity in he Middle East

What Went Wrong? The Clash Between Islam and Modernity in he Middle East

by B. Lewis

208 Pages
Harper Perennial Trade Paperback
Published January 7, 2003

For centuries, the world of Islam was in the forefront of human achievement -- the foremost military and economic power in the world, the leader in the arts and sciences of civilization. Christian Europe was seen as an outer darkness of barbarism and unbelief from which there was nothing to learn or to fear. And then everything changed. The West won victory after victory, first on the battlefield and then in the marketplace.

In this elegantly written volume, Bernard Lewis, a renowned authority an Islamic affairs, examines the anguished reaction of the Islamic world as it tried to make sense of how it had been overtaken, overshadowed, and dominated by the West. In a fascinating portrait of a culture in turmoil, Lewis shows how the Middle East turned its attention to understanding European weaponry, industry, government, education, and culture. He also describes how some Middle Easterners fastened blame on a series of scapegoats, while others asked not "Who did this to us?" but rather "Where did we go wrong?"

With a new Afterword that addresses September 11 and its aftermath, What Went Wrong? is an urgent, accessible book that no one who is concerned with contemporary affairs will want to miss.

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Leadership

Developing the Leaders Around You

Developing the Leaders Around You

by J. Maxwell


Heoric Leadership

Heoric Leadership

by C. Lowney

336 Pages
Loyola Press
Published January 1, 2005

Christian leaders, by definition, are called to follow a different set of leadership principles than other leaders follow. But what are they, and how do Christian leaders follow them? In Heroic Leadership, Jesuit-seminarian-turned-investment-banker Chris Lowney examines organizational principles of effective leadership derived from the history and teachings of the Jesuits and applies them to modern corporate culture. Based on the four core values of self-awareness, ingenuity, love, and heroism, this book identifies practices that sixteenth-century priests developed to foster dynamic, effective leadership and achieve longevity.

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Leadership and the New Science

Leadership and the New Science

by M. Wheatly

218 Pages
Berrett-Koehler Publishers
Published September 1, 2006

We live in a time of chaos, rich in potential for new possibilities. A new world is being born. We need new ideas, new ways of seeing, and new relationships to help us now. New science--the new discoveries in biology, chaos theory, and quantum physics that are changing our understanding of how the world works--offers this guidance. It describes a world where chaos is natural, where order exists "for free." It displays the intricate webs of cooperation that connect us. It assures us that life seeks order, but uses messes to get there.

Leadership and the New Science is the bestselling, most acclaimed, and most influential guide to applying the new science to organizations and management. In it, Wheatley describes how the new science radically alters our understanding of the world, and how it can teach us to live and work well together in these chaotic times. It will teach you how to move with greater certainty and easier grace into the new forms of organizations and communities that are taking shape. You'll learn that:

  • Relationships are what matters--even at the subatomic level
  • Life is a vast web of interconnections where cooperation and participation are required
  • Chaos and change are the only route to transformation

In this expanded edition, Wheatley provides examples of how non-linear networks and self-organizing systems are flourishing in the modern world. In the midst of turbulence, Wheatley shows, we create work and lives rich in meaning.

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Lincoln on Leadership: Executive Strategies for Tough Times

Lincoln on Leadership: Executive Strategies for Tough Times

by D. Phillips


Once a Marine

Once a Marine

by N. Popaditch and M. Steere

May 6, 1986: Nick Popaditch arrives at the Receiving Barracks, Marine Corps Recruit Depot, San Diego, California.

April 9, 2003: An AP photographer captures a striking image seen around the world of the Gunny Sergeant smoking a victory cigar in his tank, the haunting statue of Saddam Hussein hovering in the background. Popaditch is immortalized forever as "The Cigar Marine."

April 6, 2004: The tanker fights heroically in the battle for Fallujah and suffers grievous head wounds that leave him legally blind and partially deaf. The USMC awards him with a Silver Star for his valor and combat innovation.

April 18, 2004: "Gunny Pop" comes home to face the toughest fight of his life-a battle to remain the man and Marine he was. This is the central drama of Nick's inspiring memoir, Once a Marine: An Iraq War Tank Commander's Inspirational Memoir of Combat, Courage, and Recovery.

Readers in and out of the military will stand up and cheer for this valiant Marine's Marine, a man who embodies everything noble and proud in the Corps' long tradition. Never has modern mechanized combat seemed so immediate and real, or the fight in Iraq seemed so human and worth believing in.

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Start With Why

Start With Why

by S. Sinek

Why are some people and organizations more innovative, more influential, and more profitable than others? Why do some command greater loyalty?

In studying the leaders who've had the greatest influence in the world, Simon Sinek discovered that they all think, act, and communicate in the exact same way-and it's the complete opposite of what everyone else does. People like Martin Luther King Jr., Steve Jobs, and the Wright Brothers might have little in common, but they all started with why.

Drawing on a wide range of real-life stories, Sinek weaves together a clear vision of what it truly takes to lead and inspire.

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The Power of Communication

The Power of Communication

by H. Garcia


The Starfish and the Spider

The Starfish and the Spider

by O. Brafman and R. Beckstrom

240 Pages
Portfolio Trade
Published July 29, 2008

If you cut off a spider's head, it dies; if you cut off a starfish's leg it grows a new one, and that leg can grow into an entirely new starfish. Traditional top-down organizations are like spiders, but now starfish organizations are changing the face of business and the world.

What's the hidden power behind the success of Wikipedia, craigslist, and Skype? What do eBay and General Electric have in common with the abolitionist and women's rights movements? What fundamental choice put General Motors and Toyota on vastly different paths?

Ori Brafman and Rod Beckstrom have discovered some unexpected answers, gripping stories, and a tapestry of unlikely connections. The Starfish and the Spider explores what happens when starfish take on spiders and reveals how established companies and institutions, from IBM to Intuit to the U.S. government, are also learning how to incorporate starfish principles to achieve success.

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The Marine Corps is attempting to obtain print, electronic and audio formats for each book. For more information, visit the Commandant's Professional Reading List official site.



Click here to see a selection of books that were on the 2012 Commandant's Reading List but were not renewed for the 2013 Reading List. While these books are no longer required reading, many Marines will still find them interesting and informative.


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